CERC Branch: Invasive Carp Research

jumping silver carpUSGS scientists study the life cycle of the non-native Asian carps to better understand how to manage this invasive species. During the 1970s, bighead and silver carp were imported into the United States for use in aquaculture production of food fishes and biological control of plankton in aquaculture ponds and sewage treatment lagoons. Within ten years, the carp escaped confinement and spread to the waters of the Mississippi River basin and other large rivers.

The carp are in direct competition with native aquatic species for food and habitat. Their rapid population increase is disrupting the ecology and food web of the large rivers of the Midwest.


Silverfin: Eating Bighead and Silver Carp in cooperation with the Louisana Department of Wildlife and Fish (LDWF)

Invasive Asian Carp: "Flying Fish, Great Dish":

Louisana State University, AgCenter; Sea Grant; and the USGS (December 2009):

Flying Fish, Great Dish (Part 1: Introduction & Removing Filets)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1NVUV8yhmU
Flying Fish, Great Dish (Part 2: Making "Flying Carp Wings")
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CB-fmA07gZ8
Flying Fish, Great Dish (Part 3: Deboning Filets & Closing Credits)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RhGkjwxm_0o

In The News

  • Illinois Company is Latest to Test Market for Turning Asian Carp into Food and Profits
    Thursday, August 14, 2014
  • Study Says Lake Erie Walleye, Yellow Perch Might Survive Asian Carp Invasion
    Friday, August 08, 2014
  • Report: Asian carp Wouldn't Necessarily Spell Doom for Lake Erie
    Friday, August 08, 2014
  • Chinese Aim for Big Asian Carp Catch in Mississippi
    Tuesday, July 22, 2014
  • Chinese Aim for Big Asian Carp Catch in Mississippi
    Tuesday, July 22, 2014
  • Asian Carp Pose Serious Threat to Boaters
    Wednesday, June 18, 2014
  • Specialty in Asian Carp Brings Scientist Unexpected Fame
    Monday, May 19, 2014
  • Trash or Treasure?
    Monday, April 28, 2014
  • Chinese Market Could Help Rid Rivers of Invasive Asian Carp
    Thursday, April 24, 2014
  • Asian Markets Could Stem Tide of Asian Carp
    Tuesday, April 22, 2014
  • Chinese Market Could Help Rid Midwest Rivers of Asian Carp
    Friday, April 18, 2014
  • America Must Kill This Fish
    Friday, March 21, 2014
  • Invasion of the Killer Carp: $7B Fishing Industry at Risk as Asian Carp Move Nearer to the Great Lakes
    Monday, March 17, 2014
  • Videos Show Fish Swimming Through Barrier Meant to Stop Asian Carp
    Saturday, February 08, 2014
  • Study: Physical, Electric Barriers Best Defenses
    Wednesday, January 29, 2014
  • Study: Physical, Electric Barriers Best Defenses
    Wednesday, January 29, 2014
  • First Evidence of Carp Breeding Near Lake Erie
    Monday, December 23, 2013
  • Scientists: Asian Carp Breeding in Great Lake Tributaries
    Tuesday, November 12, 2013
  • Biologists Begin Searching Sturgeon Bay for Asian Carp Evidence
    Tuesday, November 12, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproducting Naturally in Great Lakes Tributary
    Thursday, October 31, 2013
  • Study: Asian Carp Pose Great Threat to Great Lakes
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Scientists Find Proof of Asian Carp
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Report: Fish Analysis Reveals Asian Carp Have Reproduced in Great Lakes Watershed
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Invasive Asian Carp Reproduce in Great Lakes Watershed, Scientists Say
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Holy Carp!
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Grass Carp Naturally Reproducing in Lake Erie
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • First Evidence of Grass Carp Reproduction Found in Great Lakes
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • First Evidence of Asian Carp Breeding in Lake Erie Basin Unearthed
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Confirmed: Invasive Species of Carp Found in Great Lakes
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Asian Carps Successfully Reproducing in Great Lakes, Posing a Threat to Native Fish
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Asian Carp Threatening Ecosystem in the Great Lakes
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
    (UPI)
  • Asian Carp Species Have Officially Reproduced Within the Great Lakes Watershed
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Asian Carp Spawning in Lake Erie Tributary
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproducing in or Near Lake Erie
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproduce in Great Lakes Watershed
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproduce in Great Lakes Watershed
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Are Asian Carp Reproducing in the Great Lakes?
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Worrisome Carp Are Found in a Tributary of Lake Erie
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Scientists: Asian Carp Breeding In Great Lake Tributaries
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • New Evidence Hints at Larger Great Lakes Threat from Asian Carp
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Invasive Species Asian Carp Has Moved In And Is Reproducing In The Great Lakes Watershed
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • First Evidence of Grass Carp Reproduction in the Great Lakes
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Sepcies Found in Great Lakes Watershed
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproducing in Lake Erie Basin, Study Finds
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproducing in Great Lakes Watershed: Experts
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproduce in Great Lakes Watershed
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproduce in Great Lakes Watershed
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproduce in Great Lakes Watershed
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Found In Great Lakes Watershed, Invasive Species Spent 'Entire Lives' In Ohio River
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Caught in Lake Erie Basin
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Breed in Great Lakes, Threaten Fishing
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Study: Few Asian Carp Needed to Establish Foothold
    Monday, September 16, 2013
  • Study: Few Asian Carp Needed to Establish Foothold
    Monday, September 16, 2013
  • Study: Few Asian Carp Needed to Establish Foothold
    Monday, September 16, 2013
  • Carpe Diem: A Fishy Tale
    Monday, September 16, 2013
  • Asian Carp Spawning Moves Closer to Lake Michigan
    Monday, August 19, 2013
  • Obama Administration's $50M Asian Carp Plan Doesn't Separate Waterways
    Wednesday, July 24, 2013
  • Governors Meet to Discuss Threat of Asian Carp
    Tuesday, June 04, 2013
  • Louisiana Chef’s Solution to Asian Carp Invasion – Eat Them!
    Friday, April 12, 2013
  • Asian Carp Spawning More Than Expected
    Wednesday, March 20, 2013
  • Silver Lining
    Monday, October 01, 2012
  • Asian Carp and the Great Lakes: What If the Carp Make a Home Here?
    Thursday, September 13, 2012
  • Crews Find 20 New Positive eDNA Hits for Asian Carp in Lake Erie
    Thursday, August 30, 2012
  • Fish Barrier vs. Carp DNA: What to Believe?
    Saturday, August 25, 2012
  • Biologists Refining Attack on Asian carp
    Wednesday, August 22, 2012
  • High-Tech Hunt for Asian Carp Scientists Find DNA - and Controversy
    Tuesday, August 21, 2012
  • Asian Carp Continue to Pose Problems for Kansas Waterways
    Sunday, July 15, 2012
    Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist in Columbia, Mo., studies them in the Missouri River and other waters. He’s finding a complex fish that needs unique conditions to reproduce and survive, but can do exceptionally well when all is right. Asian carp need fast-moving water for good spawning conditions. According to Chapman, the Missouri River is “an ideal place.”  Read More
  • Research Murky on Danger of Asian Carp Invasion
    Thursday, July 12, 2012
    from AP by John Flescher:
    Scientists are also digging through online databases for clues about how Asian carp have affected lake ecosystems in other countries. Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist, says silver carp have driven down populations of native species in Europe similar to the Great Lakes' prized walleye and yellow perch.  Read More
  • Research Murky On Danger Of Asian Carp Invasion
    Thursday, July 12, 2012
    Scientists are also digging through online databases for clues about how Asian carp have affected lake ecosystems in other countries. Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist, says silver carp have driven down populations of native species in Europe similar to the Great Lakes' prized walleye and yellow perch.  Read More
  • More Water Samples Show Asian Carp DNA in Chicago Canal System
    Thursday, June 28, 2012
    There is no barge traffic on the North Channel where the fourth sample was taken, and Asian carp expert Duane Chapman said that is an area where silver carp likely would congregate. "Asian carp seem to pile up below dams, so it's not a big surprise that is where an Asian carp might be," said the U.S. Geological Survey biologist.  Read More
  • Bowfishermen are Drawn to the River
    Saturday, June 23, 2012
    "They're really fecund. They produce a tremendous amount of eggs," said Duane Chapman, a research fish biologist for the U.S. Department of Geological Survey. "When the conditions are right for those eggs to survive, the population goes crazy."  Read More
  • Flooding Disperses Invasive Plant, Fish Species
    Monday, April 30, 2012
    Last year's hurricanes and flooding not only engulfed homes and carried away roads and bridges in hard-hit areas of the country, it dispersed aggressive invasive species as well.  Read More
  • The Battle Against Invasive Species Rages On
    Thursday, April 05, 2012
    Although science is the guiding principle behind invasive biology, there is no science to catching a fish. No one knows this better than Joe Deters. Having spent almost nine years with the Geological Survey and an incalculable amount of hours trolling the muddy Missouri River for fish, Deters still has a few tools that help. He mans the helm of a 22-foot, gray metal boat equipped with four plastic bins filled with hundreds of feet of netting, an empty water tank and two empty coolers. He speaks with a fisherman’s jargon; words such as “plunge pool” and “box dike” dot his vocabulary. He knows his enemy well — the silver carp.  Read More
  • Historic Changes Afoot for Chicago River
    Thursday, March 08, 2012
    “One problem with the electric barrier is that it only stops things that are self-propelled,” said Main. That means anything that swims will be deterred, but anything that floats will get through unharmed. Duane Chapman, a research fish biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, said undesirable plankton have already come through. “The electronic barrier won’t do anything to stop that.”  Read More
  • The Crusade Against Asian Carp -- Where Does It Go Now?
    Tuesday, February 28, 2012
    “It seems to be working to some degree. Larger fish seem to be less common,” said Duane Chapman, leading Asian carp expert with the U.S Geological Survey. “It does seem likely, over time, the number of fish will be substantially impacted by commercial fishing.” Chapman, however, warned there is a downside to commercial fishery that people need to be aware of. “If there is a number of people having their livelihood involved in Asian carp, it would be more politically difficult [to control] Asian carp,” he said. “People would have incentive to stock the fish and move the fish around if they can make money out of them. Even if 95 percent of people hate the carp with a passion, it just takes one percent of people, or even one person, to move them around. We don't want people to do so and it is illegal to do so. But it is awfully hard to catch someone doing that,” he said.  Read More
  • Scientist: Asian Carp Would Thrive in Lake Erie
    Monday, January 23, 2012
    Kocovsky and two other scientists, Duane Chapman and James McKenna, examined whether the Asian carp could successfully spawn in the rivers that feed into Lake Erie, taking into consideration whether the water is warm enough and other factors. They concluded that the carp could indeed reproduce.  Read More
  • Advance of the Invader: Asian Carp Continue March to Northern Waters
    Friday, January 06, 2012
    “People have a feeling that it only takes two fish, but, really, you have to have a certain number of fish in the right place at the right time to spawn,” Chapman said.  Read More
  • Asian Carp Threaten Native Species, Businesses If They Hit the Great Lakes
    Thursday, October 13, 2011
    Whether they'll affect Lake Erie's perch and walleye depends on whether there is enough food available for all of the fish. "I don't think anybody argues that there's not enough food in Lake Erie to support these fish," said Duane Chapman, U.S. Geological Survey research fish biologist. "I can't come up with a reason they wouldn't do well." USGS has studied temperatures, river flow and other factors and determined the Sandusky River and the Maumee River, large tributaries on Lake Erie, would be good habitat for the fish, he said. Konrad Dabrowski, Ohio State University director of aquaculture, has looked at those variables, too.  Read More
  • Will Asian Carp Invade Our Diets?
    Tuesday, September 27, 2011
    “The [Asian carp] filets are as good as anything you can find in the water,” Chapman said. “We usually put some rub on it and stick it on the grill and eat it that way. Sometimes we make ceviche, or we’ll fry it up for company. You can make fajitas with the carp or smoke it; add it to curry or soup; or just steam it. It’s delicious.”  Read More
  • Experts Scramble to Seal Off Potential Pathways for Dreaded Asian Carp Across Great Lakes Area
    Thursday, September 01, 2011
    According to the report, the riskiest site outside Chicago is the 700-acre Eagle Marsh near Fort Wayne, Ind. There, outlying waters from the carp-infested Wabash River sometimes mingle with the headwaters of the Maumee River, a tributary of Lake Erie. That could produce a disaster, said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fish biologist. Erie is the shallowest and warmest of the Great Lakes and has the most abundant fishery.  Read More
  • Asian Carp Battle Rages On As Species Defies Predictions
    Thursday, September 01, 2011
    According to the report, the riskiest site outside Chicago is the 700-acre Eagle Marsh near Fort Wayne, Ind. There, outlying waters from the carp-infested Wabash River sometimes mingle with the headwaters of the Maumee River, a tributary of Lake Erie. That could produce a disaster, said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fish biologist. Erie is the shallowest and warmest of the Great Lakes and has the most abundant fishery.  Read More
  • Silver Carp and Invasive Species in Minnesota
    Sunday, August 14, 2011
    Environmental testing has found that a species of the invasive Asian carp likely is present in the St. Croix River, as far north as St. Croix Falls, Wis. How will this affect Minnesota waterways, and what are the next steps in controlling the spread of this invasive species?
    Guests:
    Duane C. Chapman: Asian carp expert with the US Geological Survey and Research Fish Biologist at the Columbia Environmental Research Center.
    Luke Skinner: Supervisor of the Invasive Species Program at the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.  Read More
  • Asian Carp: Perhaps Not So Threatening to the Great Lakes After All?
    Friday, August 05, 2011
    USGS scientist Duane Chapman was referenced and research results given on percent of carp per sample from the Missouri River basin.  Read More
  • Asian Carp: DNA Evidence Finds Something Fishy Near Lake Michigan
    Friday, August 05, 2011
    The failure of a recent expedition to find any invasive Asian carp near Lake Michigan – though DNA traces say they are there – has shipping interests claiming victory and others calling foul. They point to testimony given last year at a federal hearing by Duane Chapman, an Asian carp expert with the US Geological Survey, who supported the reliability of DNA sampling and said that more-traditional methods are not as effective in detection.
     Read More
  • Fishing for an Asian Carp Needle in a Haystack
    Wednesday, August 03, 2011
    USGS scientist Duane Chapman is mentioned in Switchboard, the Natural Resource Defense Council Staff Blog, "Fishing for an Asian Carp Needle in a Haystack". (eDNA)  Read More
  • We Don't Need Asian Carp Jobs
    Monday, August 01, 2011
    USGS scientist Duane Chapman is mentioned in Michigan Live from the Muskegon Chronicle, "We Don't Need Asian Carp Jobs".  Read More
  • The Truth About Asian Carp
    Sunday, July 17, 2011
    Starting on July 17, "The Truth About Asian Carp", a six-part news documentary series by Tina Lam of the Detroit Free Press was released <http://www.freep.com/article/20110717/NEWS06/307170001>. These online multimedia articles features invasive species research and public sentiment on the Asian carp. Part of the articles focus on the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center and fisheries scientist, Duane Chapman and colleagues. In addition to these articles, Chapman was also featured in an online web chat with the Detroit Free Press on July 20, a Q&A interview on invasive carp issues and the Great Lakes <http://www.freep.com/article/20110717/OPINION05/110715050/Web-chat-today-noon-Experts-take-your-questions-about-Asian-carp?odyssey=mod%7Cnewswell%7Ctext%7COpinion%7Cs>.  Read More
  • Oxygen-free Zone Could Be Carp Barrier
    Friday, July 01, 2011
    The latest idea for keeping Asian carp out of the Great Lakes is the creation of a temporary 2-mile dead zone in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal. Duane Chapman, a carp expert with the U.S. Geological Survey, said the plan has problems. A heavy rain, for example, would dilute sewage in the canal, allowing oxygen levels to rise.  Read More
  • Missouri River Flooding is Taking a Toll on Outdoor Recreation
    Saturday, June 25, 2011
    Fisheries officials are concerned that this could be a banner year for Asian carp, the invasive species that is causing so many problems in the Missouri River. The species, known for its prolificacy, has established a stronghold in the river. But officials fear a population explosion this year. “The Asian carp love these conditions,” said Duane Chapman, a fisheries biologist for the U.S. Geological Survey. “They have their best (spawning) years in high water.”  Read More
  • Front and Center: Grafton Looks to Waterways for Future
    Friday, June 24, 2011
    Catfish had been on the decline in the Mississippi.  Then the Missouri River’s abundant catfish population flooded into the Mississippi, restocking happy fishermen. But those fishermen will soon be unhappy to learn that these latest floods are stocking the waterways with a new, unwanted population: Asian carp. A geological survey biologist, Duane Chapman, told the local paper that the carp may have been dispersed into lakes and streams that hadn’t seen them before.  Read More
  • Recent Mississippi Floods Disperse Asian Carp To New Areas
    Monday, June 13, 2011
    Considered a problem species by many near the Mississippi river, scientists fear Asian carp have been introduced to areas affected by the flood. U.S. Geological Survey biologist Duane Chapman believes there is a good chance Asian carp have reached areas previously uninhabited by these fish. Says Chapman, “We may now be finding them in lakes, ponds, bayous, anywhere the river water went. Those things will be full of carp now.”  Read More
  • Mississippi Flooding May Have Spread Asian Carp
    Friday, June 10, 2011
    Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist and Asian carp expert, says the fish are likely to show up in places where Mississippi floodwaters intruded. They can weigh up to 100 pounds, grow 4 feet long and live for 25 years.

    TIME.com
    http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2076901,00.html
    Sacramento Bee, Sacramento, CA
    http://www.sacbee.com/2011/06/10/3690989/mississippi-flooding-may-have.html
    Washington Post, Washington, D.C.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/some-experts-fear-mississippi-river-flooding-may-have-spread-invasive-asian-carp-downstream/2011/06/10/AGhaucOH_story.html
    Chicago Tribune, Chicago, IL
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/chibrknews-mississippi-flooding-may-have-spread-asian-carp-20110610,0,5800481.story?track=rss
    ABC 7, Chicago, IL
    http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news/national_world&id=8183527
    St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, MO
    http://www.stltoday.com/news/state-and-regional/missouri/article_bfd30386-ba9e-511c-b37b-903e8b64cf8f.html
    Times Union, Albany, NY
    http://www.timesunion.com/news/article/Mississippi-flooding-may-have-spread-invasive-fish-1418791.php
    Bloomberg Businessweek.com
    http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9NP62P80.htm
    LiveScience.com
    http://www.livescience.com/14552-mississippi-flooding-asian-carp.html
    Newsday.com
    http://www.newsday.com/news/nation/mississippi-flooding-may-have-spread-invasive-fish-1.2946409
    Daily Reporter, Greenfield, IN
    http://www.greenfieldreporter.com/view/story/eafba05054994957b4ea30d9777b4d12/LA--River-Flooding-Asian-Carp/
    Forbes.com
    http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2011/06/10/business-us-river-flooding-asian-carp_8510819.html
    Boston Globe, Boston, MA
    http://www.boston.com/news/science/articles/2011/06/11/floods_may_widen_spread_of_invasive_carp/
     Read More
  • Researchers: Western Lake Erie Could Support Growth of Asian Carp
    Thursday, June 02, 2011
    Three Asian carp were found in Lake Erie over the past 15 years, and they appeared quite healthy and were apparently growing rapidly, said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey scientist and one of the authors of the new paper.  Read More
  • Thoughts on Asian Carp with Duane Chapman, the 'Carp Guy'
    Thursday, May 05, 2011
    Duane Chapman, a USGS researcher, has devoted a solid portion of his career to studying the current effects and potential long-term impacts of Asian carp on places like Lake Michigan and the other Great Lakes.  Read More
  • Bighead Carp Found on St. Croix River
    Thursday, April 21, 2011
    A bighead carp caught this week on the St. Croix River at Prescott is a sobering reminder that while millions of dollars and years of planning have been focused on keeping the invasive fish from Lake Michigan, Asian carp are also moving up the Mississippi River toward Wisconsin's inland waters from the west.  Read More
  • Corps Acknowledges Fish Barrier Won't Repel All Asian Carp
    Saturday, March 26, 2011
    Duane Chapman, an Asian carp expert with the U.S. Geological Survey, said last month that his research shows that by the time a fish reaches 6 inches, it can swim at least 37 miles from where it hatched.  Read More
  • Michigan Lawmakers Buoy Efforts to Keep Asian Carp Out of Great Lakes; Public Invited for Feedback in Ypsilanti
    Thursday, March 03, 2011
    Michigan lawmakers today called for the swift and permanent separation of Lake Michigan from the Chicago waterway in order to stop Asian carp from populating Lake Michigan.  Read More
  • UPDATE: Army Corps Announces Release of Electric Fish Fence Report
    Monday, February 28, 2011
    The Government’s own Asian carp expert, Duane Chapman of the USGS, told Dan Egan that it was “a surprise” and “not good” if the Corps was not studying the electric barriers’ effectiveness at stopping juvenile fish.  According to Chapman, juvenile fish can swim at least 60 km (about 37 miles) from where they are hatched.  Read More
  • Army Corps to Release Carp Barrier Study Soon
    Monday, February 28, 2011
    U.S. Geological Survey biologists and Asian carp expert Duane Chapman, meanwhile, said if the barrier as it is operating isn't strong enough to repel fish smaller than 6 inches, "there would still be a very substantial degree of protection" for the Great Lakes.  Read More
  • No Rush Job on Carp Study
    Thursday, February 17, 2011
    The public is clamoring for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to speed up its five-year study on how to permanently block Asian carp from migrating up the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal and into Lake Michigan, but Army Corps officials say it's going to take time - at least another four years.  Read More
  • Invasive Carp Now on the Menu
    Tuesday, January 25, 2011
    Marine ecosystems beyond the Great Lakes could be threatened if market demand pushed biologists to run a sustainable carp fishery, foresaw Duane Chapman, a fish biologist with the US Geological Survey and one of the country’s chief Asian carp experts. "It only takes one guy to move the fish to a new place because he likes it. A fisherman with a bait bucket intentionally stocking them in a reservoir would be a very bad thing," he said.  Read More
  • Chef Creates Meals Featuring Invasive Asian Carp
    Sunday, January 23, 2011
    It also could be dangerous to create a taste for Asian carp in the U.S., critics say. If market demand forced biologists to manage a sustainable Asian carp fishery, instead of eliminating the fish, it could threaten waters beyond the Great Lakes, said Duane Chapman, a fish biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey and one of the nation's top Asian carp experts.  Read More
  • Let Them Eat Carp
    Tuesday, January 18, 2011
    Chef creates 'invasivore' dinner, but experts say that's not the way to halt finned intruders...  Read More
  • Lakes Adrift: Invasions Demand Leadership, Action
    Saturday, December 04, 2010
    Today’s carp crisis has actually been 35 years in the making, according to this document obtained by the Journal Sentinel. Says Duane Chapman, an Asian carp expert with the U.S. Geological Survey: "A rapid response plan in place in the 1970s could very likely have eliminated this threat before it started."  Read More
  • In Lake Erie Towns, Struggling Commercial Fishermen Fear Asian carp Could Deliver Fatal Blow
    Friday, November 26, 2010
    Already ravaged by exotic species such as the sea lamprey and quagga mussel, the Great Lakes soon may be invaded by Asian carp, greedy giants that suck plankton from the water with the brutal efficiency of vacuum cleaners. Scientists are unsure how much damage they would do, but a worst-case scenario has them unraveling the aquatic food web by crowding out competitors and decimating a fishing industry valued at more than $7 billion.  Read More
  • Fish Give Biologists a Challenge
    Monday, October 25, 2010
    Robin Calfee sets up an experiment last Monday to see what scents attract Asian carp. Calfee, a biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Columbia Environmental Research Center, is studying the behavior of Asian carp in an attempt to figure out ways to control their population.  Read More
  • Mussels May Leave Feared Carp Nothing to Eat
    Monday, October 04, 2010
    Chapman is based at the Columbia Environmental Research Center in Missouri, where researchers are measuring Asian carp's appetite for substances that will remain abundant in the Great Lakes even where plankton runs short. One example: bits of food the mussels spit out rather than digest.  Read More
  • Invading Carp May Find Lake Michigan Lacking
    Sunday, October 03, 2010
    Other scientists insist the carp could survive and even thrive without plankton. "They are very flexible fish," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist.  Read More
  • Scientists: Mussels May Eat Up Carp Food Source
    Saturday, October 02, 2010
    Chapman is based at the Columbia Environmental Research Center in Missouri, where researchers are measuring Asian carp's appetite for substances that will remain abundant in the Great Lakes even where plankton runs short. One example: bits of food the mussels spit out rather than digest.  Read More
  • Scientists: Mussels May Leave Carp Nothing to Eat
    Saturday, October 02, 2010
    Chapman is based at the Columbia Environmental Research Center in Missouri, where researchers are measuring Asian carp's appetite for substances that will remain abundant in the Great Lakes even where plankton runs short. One example: bits of food the mussels spit out rather than digest.  Read More
  • Musseling Out the Asian Carp
    Friday, October 01, 2010
    "They can eat other things besides plankton," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist to the AP.  Read More
  • Have Asian Carp Met Their Match?
    Thursday, September 30, 2010
    "They can eat other things besides plankton," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist. "They are very flexible fish."  Read More
  • Great Lakes Invader Might Scarf Up Asian Carp's Food
    Thursday, September 30, 2010
    Other scientists and policymakers insist that the carp could survive and even thrive in a plankton-depleted environment. "They can eat other things besides plankton," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist. "They are very flexible fish."  Read More
  • Scientists: Quagga Mussel Beats Asian Carp to Lake Michigan Invasion
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
    Fahnensteil says that if the carp do make it to the Great Lakes, they’ll probably leave or starve because they won’t find much nourishment. But Duane Chapman of the U.S. Geological Survey says Asian carp eat other things besides plankton – and they’ll probably do just fine eating things like the cladophora algae.  Read More
  • Scientists: Mussels May Leave Carp Nothing to Eat
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
    Chapman is based at the Columbia Environmental Research Center in Missouri, where researchers are measuring Asian carp's appetite for substances that will remain abundant in the Great Lakes even where plankton runs short. One example: bits of food the mussels spit out rather than digest.  Read More
  • Scientists: Mussels May Leave Carp Nothing to Eat
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
    "They can eat other things besides plankton," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist. "They are very flexible fish."  Read More
  • Scientists: Mussels May Leave Carp Nothing to Eat
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
    Chapman is based at the Columbia Environmental Research Center in Missouri, where researchers are measuring Asian carp's appetite for substances that will remain abundant in the Great Lakes even where plankton runs short. One example: bits of food the mussels spit out rather than digest.  Read More
  • Scientists: Mussels May Leave Carp Nothing to Eat
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
    "They can eat other things besides plankton," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist. "They are very flexible fish."  Read More
  • Invasive Mussels May Halt Asian Carp Spread
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
    Other scientists and policymakers insist the carp could survive and even thrive in a plankton-depleted environment. "They can eat other things besides plankton," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist. "They are very flexible fish."  Read More
  • Kayaker Slapped by Fish
    Friday, August 27, 2010
    Duane Chapman of the Columbia Environmental Research Center said silver carp have been known to break noses and jaws. "The silver carp jump in crazy ways," Chapman said. "Their sides have rough parts on their pectoral fins that can cut a person's face and their heads are hard and can cause serious injury."  Read More
  • Invasive Carp Threaten Kansas Waterways
    Friday, August 27, 2010
    “Even one bait bucket-full can create problems,” said Duane Chapman, an Asian carp specialist with the U.S. Geological Survey. “It only takes one silver carp to kill you if you’re a water-skier.”  Read More
  • Houston Kayaker Forced to Quit Race After Being Face-Slapped by Huge Flying Carp
    Friday, August 27, 2010
    "The silver carp jump in crazy ways," said Duane Chapman of the Columbia Environmental Research Centre. "Their sides have rough parts on their pectoral fins that can cut a person's face and their heads are hard and can cause serious injury."  Read More
  • Carp Big Hazard for MR340 Racer
    Wednesday, August 25, 2010
    Details how these invasive carp are dangerous to boaters.  Read More
  • Lake Invaders
    Monday, August 23, 2010
    Describes the lines of defense and the dilemma facing the Nation to contain the invasive carps, bighead and silver, from entering the Great Lakes.  Read More
  • Kansas Waterways at Risk as Invasive Carp Spread
    Sunday, August 22, 2010
    By the hundreds of thousands, foreign fish push against the current to the side of where water rolls over an old dam in suburban Kansas City. The school of fish stretches as far as can be seen down the Kansas River. Fish are so thick, a quick scoop with a fishing net grabs 50 or more.  Read More
  • Invasive Species: Catchin' Some Asian Carp
    Thursday, August 12, 2010
    USGS scientist, Duane Chapman, is quoted in a Time Magazine article released online August 12, regarding invasive carps nearing entry to the Great Lakes.  Read More
  • Van Hollen: Asian Carp Response Too Slow
    Friday, July 30, 2010
    Duane Chapman of the United States Geological Survey likens the impact of being stuck by a 20-pound flying fish as similar to being hit by a bowling ball. A fortunate boater who escapes injury may nevertheless be repairing broken windshields.  Read More
  • Monster Fish: Asian Carp
    Sunday, July 18, 2010
    To find out just how much of an impact Asian carp have on native fish species, Zeb joins a crew of fisherman out on the river.  Read More
  • Asian Carp Threat: Real or Overblown?
    Wednesday, July 14, 2010
    “They are a substantial threat,” said Duane Chapman, a research fish biologist and Asian carp expert with the United States Geological Survey. “These fish could cause drastic undesirable consequences.”  Read More
  • Mussels May Muscle Out Invading Carp
    Tuesday, July 06, 2010
    Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist and Asian carp expert, says the fish are remarkably resourceful at scrounging up meals. He says they likely could feast on the fields of cladophora covering the lake bottom, and they may even be able to sustain themselves on mussel excrement.  Read More
  • Efforts Against Carp Inadequate
    Wednesday, May 19, 2010
    The letter noted that Asian carp expert Duane Chapman, a federal fish biologist, said bighead and silver carp would be hard to find. In court documents, Chapman wrote: “When at low densities, adult Asian carps are amazingly difficult to capture with any standard fisheries technique. Because of this, small populations can exist without detection.  Read More
  • Asian Carp Fix: Just Eat It
    Monday, April 26, 2010
    Fish biologist Duane Chapman at the U.S. Geological Survey, says a potential drawback to creating new markets for the fish is that people could become so economically intertwined with them that there would be less incentive to eradicate it should anyone ever actually figure out how to do that. Still, he says, right now "we don't care how many [of them] people kill...We'd like people to kill more of them."  Read More
  • Can the Asian Carp Be Stopped from Destroying the Great Lakes?
    Friday, April 16, 2010
    Asian carp, an invasive species from China, stand to threaten the future of the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River. Can Chicago's Asian carp barrier hold? If it doesn't, can an answer be found to stop the Asian carp invasion?  Read More
  • Can China Eat Enough Asian Carp to Save the Great Lakes?
    Wednesday, March 31, 2010
    "Can China Eat Enough Asian Carp to Save the Great Lakes?", an article recently published in OnEarth, the online magazine of the Natural Resources Defense Council. This article describes the exportation of U.S. exotic Asian carps to China, fishes native to them and considered highly desirable as a food source, but not yet popular here in the U.S. USGS research at the Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC) focuses on the biology and ecology of these invasives, and in addition, Duane Chapman at CERC, collaborated with the Louisiana Sea Grant at Louisiana State University to produce a video demonstrating how to clean these carps and fillet them <http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/silverfin/cleaning/>, looking to generate interest in the U.S. to eat these exotics, which in turn helps rid them from U.S. waters. Chapman is quoted in the OnEarth article.  Read More
  • Asian Carp, Knocking at the Great Lakes’ Back Door
    Tuesday, March 23, 2010
    Chapman was also quick to point out that Asian carp probably won’t cause immediate catastrophic damage if they get a foothold in Lake Michigan, saying it would likely be a decade before the effects were felt.  Read More
  • Asian Carp Fishing Unlikely to Net Much
    Wednesday, February 24, 2010
    Duane Chapman, a biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey who specializes in Asian carp, agrees that it is likely no Asian carp will turn up in the commercial fish nets if there is only a small number of fish in the canal above the barrier. He says the fish are "remarkably difficult to catch" when they are at low densities. And even when a river is thick with the aquatic giants, he says catching them is a challenge because they are experts at dodging nets and strong enough to push through the electrical jolts crews use to corral the fish.  Read More
  • Carp Talks May Miss Bigger Lake Challenge
    Wednesday, February 10, 2010
    "There has been a bioenergetics study that says that bighead and silver carp could not make it on what is available in the open waters of Lake Michigan," says Chapman, biologist for the U.S. Geological Survey. "But that model does not include other feeding options that (the carp) have." Chapman says the fish can thrive on toxic blue-green algae that even quagga mussels reject. They'll also eat the sewage-like Cladophora that smothers Lake Michigan beaches in late summer. They may even eat mussel excrement. "Are we certain that Asian carps could make a go of it Lake Michigan? No," he says. "Should you be worried about it? Yes."  Read More
  • Asian Carp in the Great Lakes? This Means War!
    Tuesday, February 09, 2010
    Scientists don't know how large the Asian carp population would need to get before it becomes self-sustaining and morphs from nuisance into true threat. And some doubt the fish will ever make it into the lakes, given their need to spawn in long, fast-flowing rivers like the Illinois. "It might be 20 to 25 years before they really establish themselves," says Duane Chapman, a research fish biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. "We don't know for sure that we'll have any problems to speak of."  Read More
  • Congress to Seek More Money to Fight Asian Carp
    Wednesday, January 27, 2010
    From poisons to nets to electric jolts, authorities are studying a series of desperate measures to ward off an invasion of the Great Lakes by hefty, hungry Asian carp. More than a dozen members of Congress from the region agreed Wednesday to seek $20 million for developing ways to prevent the carp from becoming established in the lakes and jeopardizing the fishing industry by starving out competitors such as salmon and walleye.  Read More
  • Danger Posed by Carp is Questioned
    Tuesday, January 26, 2010
    "A few fish getting into Lake Michigan doesn't mean there's a population there," said Duane Chapman, a leading Asian carp expert with the U.S. Geological Survey in Missouri. "This game is not over. It's the numbers that invade the lakes that will ultimately determine whether they have a chance to get established."  Read More
  • Asian Carp Near the Great Lakes
    Tuesday, January 26, 2010
    Asian carp nearing entry into the Great Lakes...  Read More
  • Holy Carp!
    Sunday, January 24, 2010
    In our Final Hour, a fish story to scare the waders off you. Great big two-foot long Asian carp that can jump into your boat and smack you in the face or break your arm. They are moving silently up the rivers of the US and if they are not stopped before they get into the Great Lakes, they could destroy multi-billion dollar fishery.  Read More
  • What Discovery of Asian Carp DNA in Lake Michigan Means
    Thursday, January 21, 2010
    Without the DNA evidence, it would be much harder to know the invasive species had arrived, according to Duane Chapman, a research biologist and expert on Asian carp. "These fish are remarkably cryptic," said Chapman, who is with the U.S. Geological Survey in Columbia, Mo. "They are very sensitive to nets and boats. They are not caught by accident by guys with rods and reels."  Read More
  • Eating Bighead and Silver Carp
    Thursday, January 14, 2010
    The US Geological Survey, working with the LSU AgCenter, has produced a video showing two methods of cleaning fish.  Read More
  • Great Lakes Threatened by Carp Invasion
    Monday, January 11, 2010
    Now the silver and bighead carp, originally imported from Taiwan, face the might of the US Army in a last-ditch effort to prevent them from reaching the largest freshwater system in the world - the Great Lakes and their connecting rivers that straddle the Canadian border.  Read More
  • Asian Carp
    Sunday, January 03, 2010
    Protect the environment, eat jumping fish!  Read More
  • Protect the Environment, Eat Jumping Fish
    Thursday, December 24, 2009
    They’re big, ugly and have been known to leap from the water and smack boating fishermen. Asian carp have begun infiltrating area bayous and freshwater lakes, but how can Cajuns defend themselves against these aquatic invaders?  Read More
  • Asian Carp Raises Fear and Loathing on Great Lakes
    Thursday, December 10, 2009
    Federal and state officials are mounting a desperate, last-ditch effort to prevent the marauding carp from breaching an electrical barrier and slipping into the Great Lakes from the Mississippi River. Michigan is drawing up a lawsuit demanding the closing of shipping locks on a waterway that links the lakes with the Mississippi. And last week, Illinois officials poisoned a six-mile stretch of a canal to wipe out any of the carp.
    ABC http://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory?id=9303633
    Chicago Tribune http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-us-asiancarpfears,0,4153069.story
    Miami Herald http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation/AP/story/1375787.html, and many others.
     Read More
  • Fish Kill Called Necessary to Save the Great Lakes
    Sunday, December 06, 2009
    Never before have Illinois agencies tried to kill so many fish at one time. By the time the poison dissipates in a few days, state officials estimate that 200,000 pounds of fish will be bound for landfills. But they say the stakes -- the Great Lakes ecosystem and its healthy fish population -- could hardly be higher. Asian carp have slowly been making their way up the Mississippi River and its tributaries, shifting the ecological balance as they devour enormous quantities of plankton that once sustained other species.  Read More
  • Federal Inaction on Asian Carp Threatens Great Lakes
    Sunday, December 06, 2009
    U.S. Geological Survey biologist Duane Chapman told reporter Tina Lam, who covered the poisoning for the Free Press, he didn’t expect many or even any Asian carp would be found floating after the poisoning. Because in the tests he did to determine how much of the toxin Rotenone would be required to kill the carp, they dropped to the bottom after they died, and the teams on the canal were looking for floaters.  Read More
  • Live News Cast on FOX News
    Friday, December 04, 2009
    Video from "Happening Now"
    Asian carp toxicity study results discussed. See publication at: http://www.cerc.usgs.gov/content/uploadedfiles/externaldocs/carp_rotenone.pdf  Read More
  • Killer Carp: In Hiding or Just a Big Fish Tale?
    Friday, December 04, 2009
    A biologist who tested the poison on carp said Thursday that the fact that more carp weren't showing up dead in the canal wasn't surprising, since his tests showed they would sink to the bottom. "There is a chance someone will find one or two," wrote Duane Chapman, a biologist at the U.S. Geological Survey in Missouri.  Read More
  • Canal Poisoning Nets One Asian Carp - So Far
    Friday, December 04, 2009
    Federal biologist Duane Chapman has done research on the effect the fish poison has on silver and bighead carp, and he says the poison does not cause those fish to immediately float. Chapman predicted before the lone carp was found late Thursday that biologists might find a specimen or two in the wake of the poisoning, but he said nobody should be expecting a flotsam of Asian carp carcasses.  Read More
  • Open Lake Waters May Defeat Asian Carp
    Friday, November 27, 2009
    (UPI)
    Invasive Asian carp pose a dire threat to the Great Lakes' ecosystem but may not be able to breed in open lake waters, a U.S. expert on the fish said.
    "If a few fish get into the Great Lakes, it's not game over," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey researcher who studies the food-hogging fish on the heavily infested Missouri River.  Read More
  • Carp Battle Not Over Yet
    Friday, November 27, 2009
    Biologist says Asian fish need right conditions to breed in lake...
    Biologist Duane Chapman knows as much about Asian carp as anyone in the United States, and he says that even though some of the giant fish apparently have breached an electric barrier protecting the Great Lakes, all is not lost. "If a few fish get into the Great Lakes, it's not game over," said Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey researcher who has made a career out of studying the fish on the heavily infested Missouri River.  Read More
  • Asian Carp in the Missouri River
    Monday, August 10, 2009
    USGS scientist Duane Chapman provided reporters and filming crew from National Geographic an educational Missouri River tour for the upcoming winter television special, "Monster Fish," which profiles invasive Asian carp. Chapman explained the carps' invasive history, the abundance of larvae compared to native fish, and why their anatomy makes carp such a fierce competitor. National Geographic will return in Sept. for more details on Asian carp research underway at the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center.  Read More
  • Asian Carp Facing Starvation, Reproductive Problems
    Sunday, June 07, 2009
    USGS scientist Duane Chapman of the Columbia Environmental Research Center, appeared on June 7, 2009, in the Columbia Missourian about Asian carp facing starvation and reproductive problems in the Missouri River. Chapman discussed their health decline, which is hypothesized to result from a low supply of zooplankton in the river.  Read More
  • Low-volt Jolt: Carp Barrier Ready, But Can't Be Operated at Peak Strength
    Sunday, November 09, 2008
     "You can find fish of any size in the river at any time of year," said Duane Chapman, a biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. And if the fish are smaller than about five inches, tests have shown one volt simply will not repel them all."  Read More
  • Oh, Carp! Worden Man Bags 92-pound Monster with Bow and Arrow
    Thursday, May 08, 2008
    "According to Duane Chapman, a fish biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey who specializes in carp studies, Opel's catch is the largest on record by a recreational fisherman in the Western Hemisphere."  Read More
Looking for more information?