CERC News: Asian Carp in the Missouri River

Monday, August 10, 2009
(National Geographic)
Asian Carp in the Missouri River
USGS scientist Duane Chapman provided reporters and filming crew from National Geographic an educational Missouri River tour for the upcoming winter television special, "Monster Fish," which profiles invasive Asian carp. Chapman explained the carps' invasive history, the abundance of larvae compared to native fish, and why their anatomy makes carp such a fierce competitor. National Geographic will return in Sept. for more details on Asian carp research underway at the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center.

Other News

  • Q. and A.: James E. Garvey on Chinese Solutions for America’s Carp Problem
    Monday, October 13, 2014
  • Invasive Carp Finds Place in Columbia Supermarket
    Friday, October 03, 2014
  • Illinois Company is Latest to Test Market for Turning Asian Carp into Food and Profits
    Thursday, August 14, 2014
  • Study Says Lake Erie Walleye, Yellow Perch Might Survive Asian Carp Invasion
    Friday, August 08, 2014
  • Report: Asian carp Wouldn't Necessarily Spell Doom for Lake Erie
    Friday, August 08, 2014
  • Chinese Aim for Big Asian Carp Catch in Mississippi
    Tuesday, July 22, 2014
  • Chinese Aim for Big Asian Carp Catch in Mississippi
    Tuesday, July 22, 2014
  • Asian Carp Pose Serious Threat to Boaters
    Wednesday, June 18, 2014
  • Specialty in Asian Carp Brings Scientist Unexpected Fame
    Monday, May 19, 2014
  • Trash or Treasure?
    Monday, April 28, 2014
  • Chinese Market Could Help Rid Rivers of Invasive Asian Carp
    Thursday, April 24, 2014
  • Edward R. Murrow Award
    Tuesday, April 22, 2014
  • Asian Markets Could Stem Tide of Asian Carp
    Tuesday, April 22, 2014
  • Chinese Market Could Help Rid Midwest Rivers of Asian Carp
    Friday, April 18, 2014
  • America Must Kill This Fish
    Friday, March 21, 2014
  • Invasion of the Killer Carp: $7B Fishing Industry at Risk as Asian Carp Move Nearer to the Great Lakes
    Monday, March 17, 2014
  • Hagerman Refuge, USGS Lead the Way on Dust Suppression
    Saturday, March 01, 2014
  • Videos Show Fish Swimming Through Barrier Meant to Stop Asian Carp
    Saturday, February 08, 2014
  • Study: Physical, Electric Barriers Best Defenses
    Wednesday, January 29, 2014
  • Study: Physical, Electric Barriers Best Defenses
    Wednesday, January 29, 2014
  • First Evidence of Carp Breeding Near Lake Erie
    Monday, December 23, 2013
  • Fracking Chemicals 'Could Cause Infertility, Cancer and Birth Defects'
    Tuesday, December 17, 2013
  • Hormone-disrupting Chemicals Found in Water at Fracking Sites
    Monday, December 16, 2013
  • High Fracking Areas Have High Levels of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals: Study
    Monday, December 16, 2013
  • Chemicals used in ‘fracking’ can disrupt human hormone function, MU researchers say
    Monday, December 16, 2013
  • World Leader in Chemical and Metal Sampling
    Sunday, December 08, 2013
  • Scientists: Asian Carp Breeding in Great Lake Tributaries
    Tuesday, November 12, 2013
  • Biologists Begin Searching Sturgeon Bay for Asian Carp Evidence
    Tuesday, November 12, 2013
  • Climate Change May Magnify Toxic Chemical Dangers
    Friday, November 08, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproducting Naturally in Great Lakes Tributary
    Thursday, October 31, 2013
  • Study: Asian Carp Pose Great Threat to Great Lakes
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Scientists Find Proof of Asian Carp
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Report: Fish Analysis Reveals Asian Carp Have Reproduced in Great Lakes Watershed
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Invasive Asian Carp Reproduce in Great Lakes Watershed, Scientists Say
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Holy Carp!
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Grass Carp Naturally Reproducing in Lake Erie
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • First Evidence of Grass Carp Reproduction Found in Great Lakes
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • First Evidence of Asian Carp Breeding in Lake Erie Basin Unearthed
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Confirmed: Invasive Species of Carp Found in Great Lakes
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Asian Carps Successfully Reproducing in Great Lakes, Posing a Threat to Native Fish
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Asian Carp Threatening Ecosystem in the Great Lakes
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
    (UPI)
  • Asian Carp Species Have Officially Reproduced Within the Great Lakes Watershed
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Asian Carp Spawning in Lake Erie Tributary
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproducing in or Near Lake Erie
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproduce in Great Lakes Watershed
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproduce in Great Lakes Watershed
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Are Asian Carp Reproducing in the Great Lakes?
    Tuesday, October 29, 2013
  • Worrisome Carp Are Found in a Tributary of Lake Erie
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Scientists: Asian Carp Breeding In Great Lake Tributaries
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • New Evidence Hints at Larger Great Lakes Threat from Asian Carp
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Invasive Species Asian Carp Has Moved In And Is Reproducing In The Great Lakes Watershed
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • First Evidence of Grass Carp Reproduction in the Great Lakes
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Sepcies Found in Great Lakes Watershed
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproducing in Lake Erie Basin, Study Finds
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproducing in Great Lakes Watershed: Experts
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproduce in Great Lakes Watershed
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproduce in Great Lakes Watershed
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Reproduce in Great Lakes Watershed
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Found In Great Lakes Watershed, Invasive Species Spent 'Entire Lives' In Ohio River
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Caught in Lake Erie Basin
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Asian Carp Breed in Great Lakes, Threaten Fishing
    Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Study: Few Asian Carp Needed to Establish Foothold
    Monday, September 16, 2013
  • Study: Few Asian Carp Needed to Establish Foothold
    Monday, September 16, 2013
  • Study: Few Asian Carp Needed to Establish Foothold
    Monday, September 16, 2013
  • Carpe Diem: A Fishy Tale
    Monday, September 16, 2013
  • Fracking Wastewater Spill Kills Rare Fish in KY, Puts Entire Species at Risk
    Friday, August 30, 2013
  • Study Finds Fracking Fluid From 2007 Kentucky Spill May Have Killed Threatened Fish Species
    Thursday, August 29, 2013
  • Federal Agency: Fracking Liquids Harmed KY Fish
    Thursday, August 29, 2013
  • Asian Carp Spawning Moves Closer to Lake Michigan
    Monday, August 19, 2013
  • Obama Administration's $50M Asian Carp Plan Doesn't Separate Waterways
    Wednesday, July 24, 2013
  • Missouri River Researcher to Discuss How Estrogen-like Chemicals Affect Sturgeon
    Monday, July 08, 2013
  • What Is Farm Runoff Doing To The Water? Scientists Wade In
    Friday, July 05, 2013
  • Human Hormones Hamper Aquatic Wildlife
    Friday, July 05, 2013
  • Scientists Check Corn Belt Waters for Effects of Ag Runoff
    Monday, June 17, 2013
  • Governors Meet to Discuss Threat of Asian Carp
    Tuesday, June 04, 2013
  • Louisiana Chef’s Solution to Asian Carp Invasion – Eat Them!
    Friday, April 12, 2013
  • USGS Finds No Influence of Oil Platforms on Contaminant Levels in California Fishes
    Tuesday, April 02, 2013
  • Asian Carp Spawning More Than Expected
    Wednesday, March 20, 2013
  • Traces of Anxiety Drug May Affect Behavior in Fish
    Thursday, February 14, 2013
  • Asian Carp Perilously Close to Invading the Great Lakes
    Wednesday, December 12, 2012
  • Sodium Bicarbonate Can Be Toxic to Fish
    Thursday, November 01, 2012
  • USGS Lab Upgrade Boosts Capabilities
    Friday, October 19, 2012
  • USGS Opens New Research Center in Columbia
    Wednesday, October 17, 2012
  • New Research Facility Opens
    Wednesday, October 17, 2012
  • New Federal Facility Opens in Columbia
    Wednesday, October 17, 2012
  • New Columbia Environmental Research Center Facility Allows New Research Opportunities
    Wednesday, October 17, 2012
  • Fish on the Line
    Thursday, October 11, 2012
  • Silver Lining
    Monday, October 01, 2012
  • Pallids in Purgatory
    Monday, September 17, 2012
  • Feminized Fish: A Side Effect of Emerging Contaminants
    Thursday, September 13, 2012
  • Asian Carp and the Great Lakes: What If the Carp Make a Home Here?
    Thursday, September 13, 2012
  • Crews Find 20 New Positive eDNA Hits for Asian Carp in Lake Erie
    Thursday, August 30, 2012
  • Fish Barrier vs. Carp DNA: What to Believe?
    Saturday, August 25, 2012
  • Biologists Refining Attack on Asian carp
    Wednesday, August 22, 2012
  • High-Tech Hunt for Asian Carp Scientists Find DNA - and Controversy
    Tuesday, August 21, 2012
  • Asian Carp Continue to Pose Problems for Kansas Waterways
    Sunday, July 15, 2012
    Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist in Columbia, Mo., studies them in the Missouri River and other waters. He’s finding a complex fish that needs unique conditions to reproduce and survive, but can do exceptionally well when all is right. Asian carp need fast-moving water for good spawning conditions. According to Chapman, the Missouri River is “an ideal place.”  Read More
  • Research Murky on Danger of Asian Carp Invasion
    Thursday, July 12, 2012
    from AP by John Flescher:
    Scientists are also digging through online databases for clues about how Asian carp have affected lake ecosystems in other countries. Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist, says silver carp have driven down populations of native species in Europe similar to the Great Lakes' prized walleye and yellow perch.  Read More
  • Research Murky On Danger Of Asian Carp Invasion
    Thursday, July 12, 2012
    Scientists are also digging through online databases for clues about how Asian carp have affected lake ecosystems in other countries. Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist, says silver carp have driven down populations of native species in Europe similar to the Great Lakes' prized walleye and yellow perch.  Read More
  • Hagerman is Ground Zero for National Study to Control Dust
    Thursday, July 12, 2012
    "We wanted to help Hagerman solve a problem here at the refuge and to do that in an environmentally safe way," U.S. Geological Survey biologist Bethany Williams said. Scientists are at Hagerman Wildlife Refuge this week, testing products that control dust on gravel roads. Their challenge: the products have to be environmentally safe. "Right now, refuges are under a near moratorium on dust control because we don't know about some of those environmental effects," Williams said. Read More
  • Hagerman Closes Wildlife Drive for Week
    Monday, July 09, 2012
    "We are doing applications all this week and then following up for a full year afterward looking at how well the products perform but then also make sure they don't have any negative effects on roadside vegetation, wildlife, or water quality," says Williams.
    YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X6U1MNn3wjw&feature=youtube_gdata_player Read More
  • More Water Samples Show Asian Carp DNA in Chicago Canal System
    Thursday, June 28, 2012
    There is no barge traffic on the North Channel where the fourth sample was taken, and Asian carp expert Duane Chapman said that is an area where silver carp likely would congregate. "Asian carp seem to pile up below dams, so it's not a big surprise that is where an Asian carp might be," said the U.S. Geological Survey biologist.  Read More
  • Bowfishermen are Drawn to the River
    Saturday, June 23, 2012
    "They're really fecund. They produce a tremendous amount of eggs," said Duane Chapman, a research fish biologist for the U.S. Department of Geological Survey. "When the conditions are right for those eggs to survive, the population goes crazy."  Read More
  • High Salt Concentrations in Water Resulting from Coal-bed Natural Gas Production Harmful to Aquatic Life
    Thursday, June 14, 2012
    Water from coal-bed natural gas production may contain sodium bicarbonate at concentrations that can harm aquatic life, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey; Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks; the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  Read More
  • Flooding Disperses Invasive Plant, Fish Species
    Monday, April 30, 2012
    Last year's hurricanes and flooding not only engulfed homes and carried away roads and bridges in hard-hit areas of the country, it dispersed aggressive invasive species as well.  Read More
  • The Battle Against Invasive Species Rages On
    Thursday, April 05, 2012
    Although science is the guiding principle behind invasive biology, there is no science to catching a fish. No one knows this better than Joe Deters. Having spent almost nine years with the Geological Survey and an incalculable amount of hours trolling the muddy Missouri River for fish, Deters still has a few tools that help. He mans the helm of a 22-foot, gray metal boat equipped with four plastic bins filled with hundreds of feet of netting, an empty water tank and two empty coolers. He speaks with a fisherman’s jargon; words such as “plunge pool” and “box dike” dot his vocabulary. He knows his enemy well — the silver carp.  Read More
  • Sustainable Dust Control is Quickly Becoming a Reality
    Thursday, March 22, 2012
    ...dust tossed up from roads, industrial sites, farms, and practically any other site perturbed by humans does have its impact; it can travel vast distances over extended periods of time. And it can get into, and practically ruin, pretty much anything. Read More
  • Historic Changes Afoot for Chicago River
    Thursday, March 08, 2012
    “One problem with the electric barrier is that it only stops things that are self-propelled,” said Main. That means anything that swims will be deterred, but anything that floats will get through unharmed. Duane Chapman, a research fish biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, said undesirable plankton have already come through. “The electronic barrier won’t do anything to stop that.”  Read More
  • The Crusade Against Asian Carp -- Where Does It Go Now?
    Tuesday, February 28, 2012
    “It seems to be working to some degree. Larger fish seem to be less common,” said Duane Chapman, leading Asian carp expert with the U.S Geological Survey. “It does seem likely, over time, the number of fish will be substantially impacted by commercial fishing.” Chapman, however, warned there is a downside to commercial fishery that people need to be aware of. “If there is a number of people having their livelihood involved in Asian carp, it would be more politically difficult [to control] Asian carp,” he said. “People would have incentive to stock the fish and move the fish around if they can make money out of them. Even if 95 percent of people hate the carp with a passion, it just takes one percent of people, or even one person, to move them around. We don't want people to do so and it is illegal to do so. But it is awfully hard to catch someone doing that,” he said.  Read More
  • Scientist: Asian Carp Would Thrive in Lake Erie
    Monday, January 23, 2012
    Kocovsky and two other scientists, Duane Chapman and James McKenna, examined whether the Asian carp could successfully spawn in the rivers that feed into Lake Erie, taking into consideration whether the water is warm enough and other factors. They concluded that the carp could indeed reproduce.  Read More
  • Advance of the Invader: Asian Carp Continue March to Northern Waters
    Friday, January 06, 2012
    “People have a feeling that it only takes two fish, but, really, you have to have a certain number of fish in the right place at the right time to spawn,” Chapman said.  Read More
  • PCBs Eating Away at Turtles
    Wednesday, November 23, 2011
    Chemicals (PCBs) that have lingered in the environment for decades may be eating away at the bones of turtles, and maybe, us. PCBs, once commonly used in pesticides and a wide variety of industrial fluids, have been banned for decades. But with very slow breakdown times, they are still widespread in the environment, particularly in more developed areas.  Read More
  • Asian Carp Threaten Native Species, Businesses If They Hit the Great Lakes
    Thursday, October 13, 2011
    Whether they'll affect Lake Erie's perch and walleye depends on whether there is enough food available for all of the fish. "I don't think anybody argues that there's not enough food in Lake Erie to support these fish," said Duane Chapman, U.S. Geological Survey research fish biologist. "I can't come up with a reason they wouldn't do well." USGS has studied temperatures, river flow and other factors and determined the Sandusky River and the Maumee River, large tributaries on Lake Erie, would be good habitat for the fish, he said. Konrad Dabrowski, Ohio State University director of aquaculture, has looked at those variables, too.  Read More
  • Will Asian Carp Invade Our Diets?
    Tuesday, September 27, 2011
    “The [Asian carp] filets are as good as anything you can find in the water,” Chapman said. “We usually put some rub on it and stick it on the grill and eat it that way. Sometimes we make ceviche, or we’ll fry it up for company. You can make fajitas with the carp or smoke it; add it to curry or soup; or just steam it. It’s delicious.”  Read More
  • Experts Scramble to Seal Off Potential Pathways for Dreaded Asian Carp Across Great Lakes Area
    Thursday, September 01, 2011
    According to the report, the riskiest site outside Chicago is the 700-acre Eagle Marsh near Fort Wayne, Ind. There, outlying waters from the carp-infested Wabash River sometimes mingle with the headwaters of the Maumee River, a tributary of Lake Erie. That could produce a disaster, said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fish biologist. Erie is the shallowest and warmest of the Great Lakes and has the most abundant fishery.  Read More
  • Asian Carp Battle Rages On As Species Defies Predictions
    Thursday, September 01, 2011
    According to the report, the riskiest site outside Chicago is the 700-acre Eagle Marsh near Fort Wayne, Ind. There, outlying waters from the carp-infested Wabash River sometimes mingle with the headwaters of the Maumee River, a tributary of Lake Erie. That could produce a disaster, said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fish biologist. Erie is the shallowest and warmest of the Great Lakes and has the most abundant fishery.  Read More
  • Ancient Fish Gets Techno Boost
    Wednesday, August 17, 2011
    Tracking and monitoring larval and adult pallids in the Missouri is critical to understanding the species' historical decline and current status. But pallids live 15 feet beneath the surface of the Missouri, obscured by a sunless sweep of clouded current that stretches for several thousand miles to the river's confluence with the Mississippi. That's where DIDSON comes in.  Read More
  • Silver Carp and Invasive Species in Minnesota
    Sunday, August 14, 2011
    Environmental testing has found that a species of the invasive Asian carp likely is present in the St. Croix River, as far north as St. Croix Falls, Wis. How will this affect Minnesota waterways, and what are the next steps in controlling the spread of this invasive species?
    Guests:
    Duane C. Chapman: Asian carp expert with the US Geological Survey and Research Fish Biologist at the Columbia Environmental Research Center.
    Luke Skinner: Supervisor of the Invasive Species Program at the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.  Read More
  • Asian Carp: Perhaps Not So Threatening to the Great Lakes After All?
    Friday, August 05, 2011
    USGS scientist Duane Chapman was referenced and research results given on percent of carp per sample from the Missouri River basin.  Read More
  • Asian Carp: DNA Evidence Finds Something Fishy Near Lake Michigan
    Friday, August 05, 2011
    The failure of a recent expedition to find any invasive Asian carp near Lake Michigan – though DNA traces say they are there – has shipping interests claiming victory and others calling foul. They point to testimony given last year at a federal hearing by Duane Chapman, an Asian carp expert with the US Geological Survey, who supported the reliability of DNA sampling and said that more-traditional methods are not as effective in detection.
     Read More
  • Chance of Oil Spill Rises with Floodwaters: Displaced Sediment Leaves Pipeline Beneath Riverbeds Exposed to Dangers
    Thursday, August 04, 2011
    USGS scientist Robert Jacobson was quoted in a Wall Street Journal article by Jack Nicas, entitled, "Chance of Oil Spill Rises with Floodwaters: Displaced Sediment Leaves Pipeline Beneath Riverbeds Exposed to Dangers".  Read More
  • Fishing for an Asian Carp Needle in a Haystack
    Wednesday, August 03, 2011
    USGS scientist Duane Chapman is mentioned in Switchboard, the Natural Resource Defense Council Staff Blog, "Fishing for an Asian Carp Needle in a Haystack". (eDNA)  Read More
  • We Don't Need Asian Carp Jobs
    Monday, August 01, 2011
    USGS scientist Duane Chapman is mentioned in Michigan Live from the Muskegon Chronicle, "We Don't Need Asian Carp Jobs".  Read More
  • The Truth About Asian Carp
    Sunday, July 17, 2011
    Starting on July 17, "The Truth About Asian Carp", a six-part news documentary series by Tina Lam of the Detroit Free Press was released <http://www.freep.com/article/20110717/NEWS06/307170001>. These online multimedia articles features invasive species research and public sentiment on the Asian carp. Part of the articles focus on the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center and fisheries scientist, Duane Chapman and colleagues. In addition to these articles, Chapman was also featured in an online web chat with the Detroit Free Press on July 20, a Q&A interview on invasive carp issues and the Great Lakes <http://www.freep.com/article/20110717/OPINION05/110715050/Web-chat-today-noon-Experts-take-your-questions-about-Asian-carp?odyssey=mod%7Cnewswell%7Ctext%7COpinion%7Cs>.  Read More
  • Scientist Questions Flood Benefits of Public Lands Along Missouri River
    Tuesday, July 05, 2011
    Public lands along the Missouri River don't soak up nearly as much floodwater as previously believed. At least that's the initial conclusion of Robb Jacobson, who has studied the river for two decades. The idea of publicly managed wetlands warding off big floods was "wishful thinking," he said, and couldn't be backed by science. "For large floods, unless we have a lot more of these flood plains and wetlands, it's unlikely they'll store a big enough volume to attenuate the flood," Jacobson said. "Locally, they'll have an effect. But systematically, they won't."  Read More
  • Oxygen-free Zone Could Be Carp Barrier
    Friday, July 01, 2011
    The latest idea for keeping Asian carp out of the Great Lakes is the creation of a temporary 2-mile dead zone in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal. Duane Chapman, a carp expert with the U.S. Geological Survey, said the plan has problems. A heavy rain, for example, would dilute sewage in the canal, allowing oxygen levels to rise.  Read More
  • Missouri River Flooding is Taking a Toll on Outdoor Recreation
    Saturday, June 25, 2011
    Fisheries officials are concerned that this could be a banner year for Asian carp, the invasive species that is causing so many problems in the Missouri River. The species, known for its prolificacy, has established a stronghold in the river. But officials fear a population explosion this year. “The Asian carp love these conditions,” said Duane Chapman, a fisheries biologist for the U.S. Geological Survey. “They have their best (spawning) years in high water.”  Read More
  • Front and Center: Grafton Looks to Waterways for Future
    Friday, June 24, 2011
    Catfish had been on the decline in the Mississippi.  Then the Missouri River’s abundant catfish population flooded into the Mississippi, restocking happy fishermen. But those fishermen will soon be unhappy to learn that these latest floods are stocking the waterways with a new, unwanted population: Asian carp. A geological survey biologist, Duane Chapman, told the local paper that the carp may have been dispersed into lakes and streams that hadn’t seen them before.  Read More
  • Recent Mississippi Floods Disperse Asian Carp To New Areas
    Monday, June 13, 2011
    Considered a problem species by many near the Mississippi river, scientists fear Asian carp have been introduced to areas affected by the flood. U.S. Geological Survey biologist Duane Chapman believes there is a good chance Asian carp have reached areas previously uninhabited by these fish. Says Chapman, “We may now be finding them in lakes, ponds, bayous, anywhere the river water went. Those things will be full of carp now.”  Read More
  • Mississippi Flooding May Have Spread Asian Carp
    Friday, June 10, 2011
    Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist and Asian carp expert, says the fish are likely to show up in places where Mississippi floodwaters intruded. They can weigh up to 100 pounds, grow 4 feet long and live for 25 years.

    TIME.com
    http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2076901,00.html
    Sacramento Bee, Sacramento, CA
    http://www.sacbee.com/2011/06/10/3690989/mississippi-flooding-may-have.html
    Washington Post, Washington, D.C.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/some-experts-fear-mississippi-river-flooding-may-have-spread-invasive-asian-carp-downstream/2011/06/10/AGhaucOH_story.html
    Chicago Tribune, Chicago, IL
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/chibrknews-mississippi-flooding-may-have-spread-asian-carp-20110610,0,5800481.story?track=rss
    ABC 7, Chicago, IL
    http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news/national_world&id=8183527
    St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, MO
    http://www.stltoday.com/news/state-and-regional/missouri/article_bfd30386-ba9e-511c-b37b-903e8b64cf8f.html
    Times Union, Albany, NY
    http://www.timesunion.com/news/article/Mississippi-flooding-may-have-spread-invasive-fish-1418791.php
    Bloomberg Businessweek.com
    http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9NP62P80.htm
    LiveScience.com
    http://www.livescience.com/14552-mississippi-flooding-asian-carp.html
    Newsday.com
    http://www.newsday.com/news/nation/mississippi-flooding-may-have-spread-invasive-fish-1.2946409
    Daily Reporter, Greenfield, IN
    http://www.greenfieldreporter.com/view/story/eafba05054994957b4ea30d9777b4d12/LA--River-Flooding-Asian-Carp/
    Forbes.com
    http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2011/06/10/business-us-river-flooding-asian-carp_8510819.html
    Boston Globe, Boston, MA
    http://www.boston.com/news/science/articles/2011/06/11/floods_may_widen_spread_of_invasive_carp/
     Read More
  • Flood Risk Determines Wetland Restoration Potential Along Missouri River
    Friday, June 10, 2011
    High or low flood risks can determine where wetland restoration might occur on the lower Missouri River, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey Columbia Environmental Research Center and the Nature Conservancy’s Missouri River Program.
    Contact: Robert Jacobson, 573-876-1844  Read More
  • Researchers: Western Lake Erie Could Support Growth of Asian Carp
    Thursday, June 02, 2011
    Three Asian carp were found in Lake Erie over the past 15 years, and they appeared quite healthy and were apparently growing rapidly, said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey scientist and one of the authors of the new paper.  Read More
  • Record Precipitation, Reservoir Releases to Cause Missouri River Flooding
    Wednesday, June 01, 2011
    The forecast flood levels are the result of record releases of water from reservoirs on the upper Missouri River in Montana and the Dakotas. The upper Missouri River basin received a year’s worth of rain in the past few weeks, and snow pack runoff into the upper portion of the river is 140 percent of normal, according to the Weather Service.  Read More
  • Missouri River Floods as Holiday Weekend Approaches
    Thursday, May 26, 2011
    While the high levels pose a danger to river recreation, flood damage is not expected this week, said hydrologist Robert Jacobson of the U.S. Geological Survey office in Columbia.  Read More
  • Thoughts on Asian Carp with Duane Chapman, the 'Carp Guy'
    Thursday, May 05, 2011
    Duane Chapman, a USGS researcher, has devoted a solid portion of his career to studying the current effects and potential long-term impacts of Asian carp on places like Lake Michigan and the other Great Lakes.  Read More
  • Fish and Chips: Implanted Transmitters Help Map the Endangered Pallid Sturgeon
    Saturday, April 30, 2011
    To study the movements and habitats of the rare and elusive fish...  Read More
  • Missouri: Climate Concerns Add to Challenges Facing Sturgeon Recovery Efforts
    Tuesday, April 26, 2011
    “Essentially we are trying to build a more comprehensive picture of how the fish may react [to changes in water level and temperature that might be associated with a changing climate],” said Mark Wildhaber, USGS research ecologist.  Read More
  • Bighead Carp Found on St. Croix River
    Thursday, April 21, 2011
    A bighead carp caught this week on the St. Croix River at Prescott is a sobering reminder that while millions of dollars and years of planning have been focused on keeping the invasive fish from Lake Michigan, Asian carp are also moving up the Mississippi River toward Wisconsin's inland waters from the west.  Read More
  • Bighead Carp Found on St. Croix River
    Thursday, April 21, 2011
    "Based on what we know of the fish, they have everything they need" to reproduce in the Mississippi and St. Croix rivers, according to Duane Chapman, research fish biologist for the U.S. Geological Survey in Columbia, Mo. Chapman has worked full-time on Asian carp issues since 2002 and is considered a pre-eminent authority on the fish.  Read More
  • Corps Acknowledges Fish Barrier Won't Repel All Asian Carp
    Saturday, March 26, 2011
    Duane Chapman, an Asian carp expert with the U.S. Geological Survey, said last month that his research shows that by the time a fish reaches 6 inches, it can swim at least 37 miles from where it hatched.  Read More
  • Michigan Lawmakers Buoy Efforts to Keep Asian Carp Out of Great Lakes; Public Invited for Feedback in Ypsilanti
    Thursday, March 03, 2011
    Michigan lawmakers today called for the swift and permanent separation of Lake Michigan from the Chicago waterway in order to stop Asian carp from populating Lake Michigan.  Read More
  • UPDATE: Army Corps Announces Release of Electric Fish Fence Report
    Monday, February 28, 2011
    The Government’s own Asian carp expert, Duane Chapman of the USGS, told Dan Egan that it was “a surprise” and “not good” if the Corps was not studying the electric barriers’ effectiveness at stopping juvenile fish.  According to Chapman, juvenile fish can swim at least 60 km (about 37 miles) from where they are hatched.  Read More
  • Army Corps to Release Carp Barrier Study Soon
    Monday, February 28, 2011
    U.S. Geological Survey biologists and Asian carp expert Duane Chapman, meanwhile, said if the barrier as it is operating isn't strong enough to repel fish smaller than 6 inches, "there would still be a very substantial degree of protection" for the Great Lakes.  Read More
  • No Rush Job on Carp Study
    Thursday, February 17, 2011
    The public is clamoring for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to speed up its five-year study on how to permanently block Asian carp from migrating up the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal and into Lake Michigan, but Army Corps officials say it's going to take time - at least another four years.  Read More
  • Invasive Carp Now on the Menu
    Tuesday, January 25, 2011
    Marine ecosystems beyond the Great Lakes could be threatened if market demand pushed biologists to run a sustainable carp fishery, foresaw Duane Chapman, a fish biologist with the US Geological Survey and one of the country’s chief Asian carp experts. "It only takes one guy to move the fish to a new place because he likes it. A fisherman with a bait bucket intentionally stocking them in a reservoir would be a very bad thing," he said.  Read More
  • Chef Creates Meals Featuring Invasive Asian Carp
    Sunday, January 23, 2011
    It also could be dangerous to create a taste for Asian carp in the U.S., critics say. If market demand forced biologists to manage a sustainable Asian carp fishery, instead of eliminating the fish, it could threaten waters beyond the Great Lakes, said Duane Chapman, a fish biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey and one of the nation's top Asian carp experts.  Read More
  • Let Them Eat Carp
    Tuesday, January 18, 2011
    Chef creates 'invasivore' dinner, but experts say that's not the way to halt finned intruders...  Read More
  • Are They Boy or Girl Fish? It’s Now Harder to Tell
    Tuesday, January 11, 2011
    According to the US Geological Survey, intersex, the presence of both male and female characteristics within the same fish, is being observed in fish in more streams across the nation. Intersex is one manifestation of endocrine disruption in fish, which can also result in adverse effects on the development of the brain and nervous system, the growth and function of the reproductive system, and the response to stressors in the environment.  Read More
  • Help Count the Curlews
    Wednesday, January 05, 2011
    The bird folks at the U.S. Geological Survey need our help. They’re in the middle of counting and tracking the long-billed curlew and they need more eyes in the field. Trust me. You have seen this large brown shorebird, with its distinctive curved bill, long legs and plump body. These birds winter in South Texas. Thousands of these 12- to 14-inch tall birds are here now.  Read More
  • Meet Pallid Sturgeon 1094 — Beacon for a Species
    Wednesday, December 22, 2010
    She’s out there somewhere in the Missouri River currents, carrying clues as to why her kind is in danger. A transmitter, previously placed in her belly, chirps like a cricket every 10 seconds; her name is the same as the unique audio code that the transmitter emits — 1094.  Read More
  • Researchers Develop Models to Predict Pallid Sturgeon’s Response to Climate Change
    Thursday, December 09, 2010
    Researchers at the United States Geological Survey’s Columbia Environmental Research Center – along with those at the University of Missouri and Iowa State University – are developing models to help predict how the Missouri River’s sturgeon population could respond to climate change.  Read More
  • Is Your Birth Control Making Male Fish Sprout Ovaries?
    Wednesday, December 08, 2010
    Ecologists keep tabs on sturgeon, a prehistoric fish that likes the Missouri River's muddy waters. The pallid sturgeon and the lake sturgeon are endangered, and the more common shovelnose sturgeon has become "a species of concern."  Read More
  • Columbia Researchers Study Intersex Sturgeon in Missouri River
    Tuesday, December 07, 2010
    Ecologist Aaron DeLonay, with the U.S. Geological Survey, holds a shovelnose sturgeon netted just east of Jefferson City on the Missouri River that he estimates to be 3 or 4 years old Oct. 29. DeLonay and a small team of scientists go out on the river frequently to check on the reproductive condition of a more rare fish, the pallid sturgeon, to see, and in some cases ensure, successful reproduction. Whenever DeLonay and his team catch a pallid sturgeon that they have not caught before, they implant a tracking device that, other than tracking water depth and temperature, can be used to determine if the fish mated.  Read More
  • Lakes Adrift: Invasions Demand Leadership, Action
    Saturday, December 04, 2010
    Today’s carp crisis has actually been 35 years in the making, according to this document obtained by the Journal Sentinel. Says Duane Chapman, an Asian carp expert with the U.S. Geological Survey: "A rapid response plan in place in the 1970s could very likely have eliminated this threat before it started."  Read More
  • Endangered Pallid Sturgeon
    Saturday, December 04, 2010
    Over the past week I’ve been working on a story about a study at the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center. Researchers there, in conjunction with those at the University of Missouri and the Iowa State University, are developing models to help predict how the Missouri River sturgeon population may respond to climate change.
    --Courtney Flatt
    Producer for Business Beat, Reporter and Web Producer  Read More
  • In Lake Erie Towns, Struggling Commercial Fishermen Fear Asian carp Could Deliver Fatal Blow
    Friday, November 26, 2010
    Already ravaged by exotic species such as the sea lamprey and quagga mussel, the Great Lakes soon may be invaded by Asian carp, greedy giants that suck plankton from the water with the brutal efficiency of vacuum cleaners. Scientists are unsure how much damage they would do, but a worst-case scenario has them unraveling the aquatic food web by crowding out competitors and decimating a fishing industry valued at more than $7 billion.  Read More
  • New Tool for Studying Radiation's Effects
    Tuesday, November 16, 2010
    Most research on the ecological and human health effects of ionizing radiation has focused on high doses over short periods of time. But chronic exposure to low doses may cause problems too. Researchers presented a new tool to study the consequences of such exposures in living animals at the annual meeting of the Society of Environmental and Toxicological Chemistry (SETAC) in Portland, Oregon on November 10: a transgenic fish that fluoresces in response to radiation-induced changes.  Read More
  • Fish Give Biologists a Challenge
    Monday, October 25, 2010
    Robin Calfee sets up an experiment last Monday to see what scents attract Asian carp. Calfee, a biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Columbia Environmental Research Center, is studying the behavior of Asian carp in an attempt to figure out ways to control their population.  Read More
  • Mussels May Leave Feared Carp Nothing to Eat
    Monday, October 04, 2010
    Chapman is based at the Columbia Environmental Research Center in Missouri, where researchers are measuring Asian carp's appetite for substances that will remain abundant in the Great Lakes even where plankton runs short. One example: bits of food the mussels spit out rather than digest.  Read More
  • Invading Carp May Find Lake Michigan Lacking
    Sunday, October 03, 2010
    Other scientists insist the carp could survive and even thrive without plankton. "They are very flexible fish," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist.  Read More
  • Scientists: Mussels May Eat Up Carp Food Source
    Saturday, October 02, 2010
    Chapman is based at the Columbia Environmental Research Center in Missouri, where researchers are measuring Asian carp's appetite for substances that will remain abundant in the Great Lakes even where plankton runs short. One example: bits of food the mussels spit out rather than digest.  Read More
  • Scientists: Mussels May Leave Carp Nothing to Eat
    Saturday, October 02, 2010
    Chapman is based at the Columbia Environmental Research Center in Missouri, where researchers are measuring Asian carp's appetite for substances that will remain abundant in the Great Lakes even where plankton runs short. One example: bits of food the mussels spit out rather than digest.  Read More
  • Musseling Out the Asian Carp
    Friday, October 01, 2010
    "They can eat other things besides plankton," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist to the AP.  Read More
  • Have Asian Carp Met Their Match?
    Thursday, September 30, 2010
    "They can eat other things besides plankton," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist. "They are very flexible fish."  Read More
  • Great Lakes Invader Might Scarf Up Asian Carp's Food
    Thursday, September 30, 2010
    Other scientists and policymakers insist that the carp could survive and even thrive in a plankton-depleted environment. "They can eat other things besides plankton," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist. "They are very flexible fish."  Read More
  • Scientists: Quagga Mussel Beats Asian Carp to Lake Michigan Invasion
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
    Fahnensteil says that if the carp do make it to the Great Lakes, they’ll probably leave or starve because they won’t find much nourishment. But Duane Chapman of the U.S. Geological Survey says Asian carp eat other things besides plankton – and they’ll probably do just fine eating things like the cladophora algae.  Read More
  • Scientists: Mussels May Leave Carp Nothing to Eat
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
    Chapman is based at the Columbia Environmental Research Center in Missouri, where researchers are measuring Asian carp's appetite for substances that will remain abundant in the Great Lakes even where plankton runs short. One example: bits of food the mussels spit out rather than digest.  Read More
  • Scientists: Mussels May Leave Carp Nothing to Eat
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
    Chapman is based at the Columbia Environmental Research Center in Missouri, where researchers are measuring Asian carp's appetite for substances that will remain abundant in the Great Lakes even where plankton runs short. One example: bits of food the mussels spit out rather than digest.  Read More
  • Scientists: Mussels May Leave Carp Nothing to Eat
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
    "They can eat other things besides plankton," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist. "They are very flexible fish."  Read More
  • Scientists: Mussels May Leave Carp Nothing to Eat
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
    Chapman is based at the Columbia Environmental Research Center in Missouri, where researchers are measuring Asian carp's appetite for substances that will remain abundant in the Great Lakes even where plankton runs short. One example: bits of food the mussels spit out rather than digest.  Read More
  • Scientists: Mussels May Leave Carp Nothing to Eat
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
    "They can eat other things besides plankton," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist. "They are very flexible fish."  Read More
  • Invasive Mussels May Halt Asian Carp Spread
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010
    Other scientists and policymakers insist the carp could survive and even thrive in a plankton-depleted environment. "They can eat other things besides plankton," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey fisheries biologist. "They are very flexible fish."  Read More
  • On the Job: Aquatic Toxicologist
    Thursday, September 23, 2010
    Unlike Nemo, not all fish have their dad, Dory and a flock of sea turtles to save them. For less fortunate fish, there are aquatic toxicologists. Meet Dr. Chris Ingersoll, who studies the effects of chemical contaminants on aquatic organisms in order to keep underwater environments safe.  Read More
  • USGS to Break Ground on Research Center
    Friday, September 17, 2010
    This morning Columbia city officials and representatives of the U.S. Geological Survey will break ground on a new aquatic research center off New Haven Road. Construction on the 23,000-square-foot building will cost $11 million and bring about a hundred jobs to the city. The project will be paid for with federal stimulus money.  Read More
  • Update: Construction for New Facility Brings New Jobs
    Friday, September 17, 2010
    The flipping of some dirt symbolized the start of construction for the new building east of Columbia on New Haven Road. Area dignitaries Friday broke ground for a $10.7 million renovation project at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Columbia Environmental Research Center, also known as CERC.  Read More
  • Research Gets a Boost
    Friday, September 17, 2010
    The U.S. Geological Survey’s Columbia Environmental Research Center is about to get a face-lift courtesy of federal stimulus dollars. After years of requesting money to update its creaking laboratories and offices, the center will receive $10.7 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.  Read More
  • Aquatic Research Center Breaks Ground in Columbia
    Friday, September 17, 2010
    The employees of the Columbia Environmental Research Center can look forward to consolidating their nine buildings and working with state-of-the-art equipment when a new aquatic research center is finished.  Read More
  • Groundbreaking Set for New Federal Office and Laboratory Facility in Columbia
    Tuesday, September 14, 2010
    Media Advisory:
    The U.S. Geological Survey’s Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC) will break ground on a new, state-of-the-art, office and laboratory facility in Columbia at 10 a.m. on Friday, September 17. The 23,800 square foot facility will be built at 4200 New Haven Road. Aquatic research facilities on the Center grounds will also be renovated as part of the one-year construction project.
    Total project cost is estimated to be $10.7 million dollars, funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. Design and construction activities are anticipated to employ more than 100 Missourians.  Estimates show that the new facility will result in an overall savings of $200,000 in annual maintenance costs.  Read More
  • Long-billed Curlews
    Saturday, September 11, 2010
    USGS scientist Marc Woodin made a repeat appearance on the KIII-TV segment of "South Texas Birding" on September 11. This interview focuses on long-billed curlews that winter along the Texas coast, the easternmost major wintering area in North America for this large shorebird. This winter in Texas, the USGS initiates new research on this Species of Concern.  Read More
  • Kayaker Slapped by Fish
    Friday, August 27, 2010
    Duane Chapman of the Columbia Environmental Research Center said silver carp have been known to break noses and jaws. "The silver carp jump in crazy ways," Chapman said. "Their sides have rough parts on their pectoral fins that can cut a person's face and their heads are hard and can cause serious injury."  Read More
  • Invasive Carp Threaten Kansas Waterways
    Friday, August 27, 2010
    “Even one bait bucket-full can create problems,” said Duane Chapman, an Asian carp specialist with the U.S. Geological Survey. “It only takes one silver carp to kill you if you’re a water-skier.”  Read More
  • Houston Kayaker Forced to Quit Race After Being Face-Slapped by Huge Flying Carp
    Friday, August 27, 2010
    "The silver carp jump in crazy ways," said Duane Chapman of the Columbia Environmental Research Centre. "Their sides have rough parts on their pectoral fins that can cut a person's face and their heads are hard and can cause serious injury."  Read More
  • Rise of the She-Fish?
    Wednesday, August 25, 2010
    Scientists want to know if Rio Grande contaminants are feminizing the endangered silvery minnow.  Read More
  • Carp Big Hazard for MR340 Racer
    Wednesday, August 25, 2010
    Details how these invasive carp are dangerous to boaters.  Read More
  • EPA, Stay Focused! Email Spats Don't Change the Science on Atrazine - It's Bad!
    Tuesday, August 24, 2010
    The EPA and USGS have found this chemical in almost every waterway where they have looked for it, and USGS even identified an association between contaminated streams and impaired fish reproduction. Our report also features a rundown of the most current science on the health impact of the pesticide, which references the work of Hayes’ lab that has been published in the peer-reviewed scientific journals, along with the published research of dozens of other scientists that all provide evidence of atrazine’s harms.  Read More
  • Lake Invaders
    Monday, August 23, 2010
    Describes the lines of defense and the dilemma facing the Nation to contain the invasive carps, bighead and silver, from entering the Great Lakes.  Read More
  • Kansas Waterways at Risk as Invasive Carp Spread
    Sunday, August 22, 2010
    By the hundreds of thousands, foreign fish push against the current to the side of where water rolls over an old dam in suburban Kansas City. The school of fish stretches as far as can be seen down the Kansas River. Fish are so thick, a quick scoop with a fishing net grabs 50 or more.  Read More
  • Invasive Species: Catchin' Some Asian Carp
    Thursday, August 12, 2010
    USGS scientist, Duane Chapman, is quoted in a Time Magazine article released online August 12, regarding invasive carps nearing entry to the Great Lakes.  Read More
  • Team Busy Tagging Sturgeon at Hatchery
    Wednesday, August 04, 2010
    Several agencies teamed up at the Neosho National Fish Hatchery this week to give endangered pallid sturgeon a better chance for survival.
    A large contingent of the team came from Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, but one came from Blind Pony State Fish Hatchery, and others came from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Columbia, Mo. office of the US Geological Survey and the Chillicothe office of the Missouri Department of Conservation making for a team of 28.  Read More
  • Van Hollen: Asian Carp Response Too Slow
    Friday, July 30, 2010
    Duane Chapman of the United States Geological Survey likens the impact of being stuck by a 20-pound flying fish as similar to being hit by a bowling ball. A fortunate boater who escapes injury may nevertheless be repairing broken windshields.  Read More
  • Monster Fish: Asian Carp
    Sunday, July 18, 2010
    To find out just how much of an impact Asian carp have on native fish species, Zeb joins a crew of fisherman out on the river.  Read More
  • Asian Carp Threat: Real or Overblown?
    Wednesday, July 14, 2010
    “They are a substantial threat,” said Duane Chapman, a research fish biologist and Asian carp expert with the United States Geological Survey. “These fish could cause drastic undesirable consequences.”  Read More
  • Mussels May Muscle Out Invading Carp
    Tuesday, July 06, 2010
    Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey biologist and Asian carp expert, says the fish are remarkably resourceful at scrounging up meals. He says they likely could feast on the fields of cladophora covering the lake bottom, and they may even be able to sustain themselves on mussel excrement.  Read More
  • Common Herbicide is Harmful to Fish
    Friday, June 25, 2010
    The study was conducted by Donald Tillitt and a team of researchers at the Environmental Research Center in Columbia. The team exposed fathead minnows Pimephales promelas to levels of atrazine varying from 0-50 micrograms - all below the 'USEPA Office of Pesticides Aquatic Life Benchmark' of 65 micrograms per litre for chronic exposure of fish.  Read More
  • Work Shows Atrazine’s Potential Harm
    Sunday, May 30, 2010
    In an unrelated study, Don Tillitt, a research chemist at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Columbia Environmental Research Center, found that fathead minnows exposed to Atrazine produce fewer eggs and spawn less often than control groups. The study is one of the first to suggest that Atrazine can be harmful to fish at levels far lower than the benchmarks set by the Environmental Protection Agency.  Read More
  • Study Finds Atrazine Exposure Impairs Fish Reproduction
    Thursday, May 20, 2010
    Now researchers with the United States Geological Survey have shown that atrazine exposure can also lower fish reproduction and cause abnormalities in fish reproductive organs.  Read More
  • Commonly Used Atrazine Herbicide Adversely Affects Fish Reproduction
    Thursday, May 20, 2010
    Fathead minnows were exposed to atrazine at the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Centre in Columbia, Mo., and observed for effects on egg production, tissue abnormalities and hormone levels. Fish were exposed to concentrations ranging from zero to 50 micrograms per litre of atrazine for up to 30 days. All tested levels of exposure are less than the USEPA Office of Pesticides Aquatic Life Benchmark of 65 micrograms per litre for chronic exposure of fish. Thus, substantial reproductive effects were observed in this study at concentrations below the USEPA water-quality guideline.  Read More
  • New Study Finds Weed Killer Hurts Fish Spawning
    Wednesday, May 19, 2010
    USGS scientists, in a study published in the journal Aquatic Toxicology, reported that fathead minnows did not spawn as much or as well when exposed in the laboratory to concentrations of the pesticide below what's found in the wild. Exposed fish produced fewer eggs, and researchers observed abnormalities in reproductive tissues of exposed males and females.  Read More
  • Commonly Used Atrazine Herbicide Adversely Affects Fish Reproduction
    Wednesday, May 19, 2010
    Atrazine, one of the most commonly used herbicides in the world, has been shown to affect reproduction of fish, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study.  Read More
  • Common Herbicide Atrazine Affects Fish Reproduction
    Wednesday, May 19, 2010
    The farm herbicide atrazine, used widely worldwide, has been shown to affect reproduction in fish, according to a US government study released Wednesday.  Read More
  • Atrazine Affects Fish Reproduction
    Wednesday, May 19, 2010
    "Concentrations of atrazine commonly found in agricultural streams and rivers caused reduced reproduction and spawning, as well as tissue abnormalities in laboratory studies with fish," said USGS scientist Donald Tillitt, who led the research.  Read More
  • Efforts Against Carp Inadequate
    Wednesday, May 19, 2010
    The letter noted that Asian carp expert Duane Chapman, a federal fish biologist, said bighead and silver carp would be hard to find. In court documents, Chapman wrote: “When at low densities, adult Asian carps are amazingly difficult to capture with any standard fisheries technique. Because of this, small populations can exist without detection.  Read More
  • Asian Carp Fix: Just Eat It
    Monday, April 26, 2010
    Fish biologist Duane Chapman at the U.S. Geological Survey, says a potential drawback to creating new markets for the fish is that people could become so economically intertwined with them that there would be less incentive to eradicate it should anyone ever actually figure out how to do that. Still, he says, right now "we don't care how many [of them] people kill...We'd like people to kill more of them."  Read More
  • Can the Asian Carp Be Stopped from Destroying the Great Lakes?
    Friday, April 16, 2010
    Asian carp, an invasive species from China, stand to threaten the future of the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River. Can Chicago's Asian carp barrier hold? If it doesn't, can an answer be found to stop the Asian carp invasion?  Read More
  • Tap Water: Safe to Drink
    Sunday, April 11, 2010
    “A drinking water sample has many chemicals in it. But they’re all likely to be at very, very low concentration,” he said. “Are they a problem to humans? I don’t know. I don’t think so.”  Read More
  • Pharmed Fish
    Thursday, April 01, 2010
    In the Spring issue of Trout, a quarterly magazine of Trout Unlimited, is a feature story, "Pharmed Fish: Are Pharmaceuticals and Other Pollutants to Blame for Alarming Numbers of Intersex Fish?", highlighting USGS fish health research by Jo Ellen Hinck, conducted over a 10-year period across nine U.S. river basins, the Nation's first comprehensive look at fish health including the intersex condition.  Read More
  • Can China Eat Enough Asian Carp to Save the Great Lakes?
    Wednesday, March 31, 2010
    "Can China Eat Enough Asian Carp to Save the Great Lakes?", an article recently published in OnEarth, the online magazine of the Natural Resources Defense Council. This article describes the exportation of U.S. exotic Asian carps to China, fishes native to them and considered highly desirable as a food source, but not yet popular here in the U.S. USGS research at the Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC) focuses on the biology and ecology of these invasives, and in addition, Duane Chapman at CERC, collaborated with the Louisiana Sea Grant at Louisiana State University to produce a video demonstrating how to clean these carps and fillet them <http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/silverfin/cleaning/>, looking to generate interest in the U.S. to eat these exotics, which in turn helps rid them from U.S. waters. Chapman is quoted in the OnEarth article.  Read More
  • Asian Carp, Knocking at the Great Lakes’ Back Door
    Tuesday, March 23, 2010
    Chapman was also quick to point out that Asian carp probably won’t cause immediate catastrophic damage if they get a foothold in Lake Michigan, saying it would likely be a decade before the effects were felt.  Read More
  • Asian Carp Fishing Unlikely to Net Much
    Wednesday, February 24, 2010
    Duane Chapman, a biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey who specializes in Asian carp, agrees that it is likely no Asian carp will turn up in the commercial fish nets if there is only a small number of fish in the canal above the barrier. He says the fish are "remarkably difficult to catch" when they are at low densities. And even when a river is thick with the aquatic giants, he says catching them is a challenge because they are experts at dodging nets and strong enough to push through the electrical jolts crews use to corral the fish.  Read More
  • Carp Talks May Miss Bigger Lake Challenge
    Wednesday, February 10, 2010
    "There has been a bioenergetics study that says that bighead and silver carp could not make it on what is available in the open waters of Lake Michigan," says Chapman, biologist for the U.S. Geological Survey. "But that model does not include other feeding options that (the carp) have." Chapman says the fish can thrive on toxic blue-green algae that even quagga mussels reject. They'll also eat the sewage-like Cladophora that smothers Lake Michigan beaches in late summer. They may even eat mussel excrement. "Are we certain that Asian carps could make a go of it Lake Michigan? No," he says. "Should you be worried about it? Yes."  Read More
  • Asian Carp in the Great Lakes? This Means War!
    Tuesday, February 09, 2010
    Scientists don't know how large the Asian carp population would need to get before it becomes self-sustaining and morphs from nuisance into true threat. And some doubt the fish will ever make it into the lakes, given their need to spawn in long, fast-flowing rivers like the Illinois. "It might be 20 to 25 years before they really establish themselves," says Duane Chapman, a research fish biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. "We don't know for sure that we'll have any problems to speak of."  Read More
  • Congress to Seek More Money to Fight Asian Carp
    Wednesday, January 27, 2010
    From poisons to nets to electric jolts, authorities are studying a series of desperate measures to ward off an invasion of the Great Lakes by hefty, hungry Asian carp. More than a dozen members of Congress from the region agreed Wednesday to seek $20 million for developing ways to prevent the carp from becoming established in the lakes and jeopardizing the fishing industry by starving out competitors such as salmon and walleye.  Read More
  • Danger Posed by Carp is Questioned
    Tuesday, January 26, 2010
    "A few fish getting into Lake Michigan doesn't mean there's a population there," said Duane Chapman, a leading Asian carp expert with the U.S. Geological Survey in Missouri. "This game is not over. It's the numbers that invade the lakes that will ultimately determine whether they have a chance to get established."  Read More
  • Asian Carp Near the Great Lakes
    Tuesday, January 26, 2010
    Asian carp nearing entry into the Great Lakes...  Read More
  • Holy Carp!
    Sunday, January 24, 2010
    In our Final Hour, a fish story to scare the waders off you. Great big two-foot long Asian carp that can jump into your boat and smack you in the face or break your arm. They are moving silently up the rivers of the US and if they are not stopped before they get into the Great Lakes, they could destroy multi-billion dollar fishery.  Read More
  • What Discovery of Asian Carp DNA in Lake Michigan Means
    Thursday, January 21, 2010
    Without the DNA evidence, it would be much harder to know the invasive species had arrived, according to Duane Chapman, a research biologist and expert on Asian carp. "These fish are remarkably cryptic," said Chapman, who is with the U.S. Geological Survey in Columbia, Mo. "They are very sensitive to nets and boats. They are not caught by accident by guys with rods and reels."  Read More
  • Eating Bighead and Silver Carp
    Thursday, January 14, 2010
    The US Geological Survey, working with the LSU AgCenter, has produced a video showing two methods of cleaning fish.  Read More
  • U.S. Geological Survey in Columbia Plans $7 million Facility Overhaul
    Wednesday, January 13, 2010
    The Columbia Environmental Research Center is planning a $7 million overhaul of its labs and offices in southeast Columbia. The U.S. Geological Survey in Columbia researches the effects of water quality on aquatic organisms and river science, said Michael Mac, the center's director. The effectiveness of these studies will be improved with more adequate facilities, he said.  Read More
  • Great Lakes Threatened by Carp Invasion
    Monday, January 11, 2010
    Now the silver and bighead carp, originally imported from Taiwan, face the might of the US Army in a last-ditch effort to prevent them from reaching the largest freshwater system in the world - the Great Lakes and their connecting rivers that straddle the Canadian border.  Read More
  • Asian Carp
    Sunday, January 03, 2010
    Protect the environment, eat jumping fish!  Read More
  • Protect the Environment, Eat Jumping Fish
    Thursday, December 24, 2009
    They’re big, ugly and have been known to leap from the water and smack boating fishermen. Asian carp have begun infiltrating area bayous and freshwater lakes, but how can Cajuns defend themselves against these aquatic invaders?  Read More
  • Asian Carp Raises Fear and Loathing on Great Lakes
    Thursday, December 10, 2009
    Federal and state officials are mounting a desperate, last-ditch effort to prevent the marauding carp from breaching an electrical barrier and slipping into the Great Lakes from the Mississippi River. Michigan is drawing up a lawsuit demanding the closing of shipping locks on a waterway that links the lakes with the Mississippi. And last week, Illinois officials poisoned a six-mile stretch of a canal to wipe out any of the carp.
    ABC http://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory?id=9303633
    Chicago Tribune http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-ap-us-asiancarpfears,0,4153069.story
    Miami Herald http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation/AP/story/1375787.html, and many others.
     Read More
  • Fish Kill Called Necessary to Save the Great Lakes
    Sunday, December 06, 2009
    Never before have Illinois agencies tried to kill so many fish at one time. By the time the poison dissipates in a few days, state officials estimate that 200,000 pounds of fish will be bound for landfills. But they say the stakes -- the Great Lakes ecosystem and its healthy fish population -- could hardly be higher. Asian carp have slowly been making their way up the Mississippi River and its tributaries, shifting the ecological balance as they devour enormous quantities of plankton that once sustained other species.  Read More
  • Federal Inaction on Asian Carp Threatens Great Lakes
    Sunday, December 06, 2009
    U.S. Geological Survey biologist Duane Chapman told reporter Tina Lam, who covered the poisoning for the Free Press, he didn’t expect many or even any Asian carp would be found floating after the poisoning. Because in the tests he did to determine how much of the toxin Rotenone would be required to kill the carp, they dropped to the bottom after they died, and the teams on the canal were looking for floaters.  Read More
  • Live News Cast on FOX News
    Friday, December 04, 2009
    Video from "Happening Now"
    Asian carp toxicity study results discussed. See publication at: http://www.cerc.usgs.gov/content/uploadedfiles/externaldocs/carp_rotenone.pdf  Read More
  • Killer Carp: In Hiding or Just a Big Fish Tale?
    Friday, December 04, 2009
    A biologist who tested the poison on carp said Thursday that the fact that more carp weren't showing up dead in the canal wasn't surprising, since his tests showed they would sink to the bottom. "There is a chance someone will find one or two," wrote Duane Chapman, a biologist at the U.S. Geological Survey in Missouri.  Read More
  • Canal Poisoning Nets One Asian Carp - So Far
    Friday, December 04, 2009
    Federal biologist Duane Chapman has done research on the effect the fish poison has on silver and bighead carp, and he says the poison does not cause those fish to immediately float. Chapman predicted before the lone carp was found late Thursday that biologists might find a specimen or two in the wake of the poisoning, but he said nobody should be expecting a flotsam of Asian carp carcasses.  Read More
  • Open Lake Waters May Defeat Asian Carp
    Friday, November 27, 2009
    (UPI)
    Invasive Asian carp pose a dire threat to the Great Lakes' ecosystem but may not be able to breed in open lake waters, a U.S. expert on the fish said.
    "If a few fish get into the Great Lakes, it's not game over," said Duane Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey researcher who studies the food-hogging fish on the heavily infested Missouri River.  Read More
  • Carp Battle Not Over Yet
    Friday, November 27, 2009
    Biologist says Asian fish need right conditions to breed in lake...
    Biologist Duane Chapman knows as much about Asian carp as anyone in the United States, and he says that even though some of the giant fish apparently have breached an electric barrier protecting the Great Lakes, all is not lost. "If a few fish get into the Great Lakes, it's not game over," said Chapman, a U.S. Geological Survey researcher who has made a career out of studying the fish on the heavily infested Missouri River.  Read More
  • Something Fishy in the Water
    Wednesday, November 25, 2009
    Dean Reynolds, Correspondent: "Something strange is happening to the fish in America's rivers, lakes and ponds. Chemical pollution seems to be disrupting their hormones, blurring the line between male and female."  text  Read More
  • After a Devastating Fire, an Intense Study of Its Effects
    Saturday, October 03, 2009
    The Station fire, which in over a month has burned away nearly a quarter of this vast, mountainous backdrop to the Los Angeles skyline, is finally just about out, sending all but a handful of firefighters home. Now, the scientists swoop in.  Read More
  • Study: Gender-Bending Fish Widespread in U.S.
    Wednesday, September 16, 2009
    A survey of fish in rivers and streams around the country shows that a large percentage of male bass have acquired feminine characteristics. Scientists say it's the biggest survey of this gender-bending condition in U.S. waters. And while they can't be sure of the cause, they suspect industrial and pharmaceutical chemicals are the culprit.  Read More
  • More Hermaphrodite Fish in U.S. Rivers
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    Male fish with female body parts have been showing up in our nation's rivers for a while now, but a new study found a surprising number of mixed-up fish.
    From the Mississippi to the Rio Grande, from the Appalachia to the Colorado, researchers found large numbers of river fish with egg cells in their testes, particularly in two species: smallmouth and largemouth bass.  Read More
  • Widespread Occurrence Of Intersex Bass Found In U.S. Rivers
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    Of the 16 fish species researchers examined from 1995 to 2004, the condition was most common by far in smallmouth and largemouth bass: a third of all male smallmouth bass and a fifth of all male largemouth bass were intersex. This condition is primarily revealed in male fish that have immature female egg cells in their testes, but occasionally female fish will have male characteristics as well.  Read More
  • Widespread Occurrence of Intersex Bass Found in U.S. Rivers
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    Intersex in smallmouth and largemouth basses is widespread in numerous river basins throughout the United States is the major finding of the most comprehensive and large-scale evaluation of the condition, according to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research published online in Aquatic Toxicology.  Read More
  • U.S. Finds Hermaphroditic Bass Widespread in Nation's Rivers, Including Columbia
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    Sexual deformities in smallmouth and largemouth bass are more widespread than previously thought in river basins across the country, including the Columbia River basin in the Northwest.  Read More
  • Male Bass in Many US Rivers Feminized, Study Finds
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    Government scientists figure that one out of five male black bass in American river basins have egg cells growing inside their sexual organs, a sign of how widespread fish feminizing has become. The findings come from the U.S. Geological Survey in its first comprehensive examination of intersex fish in America, a problem linked to women's birth control pills and other hormone treatments that seep into rivers. Sporadic reports of feminized fish have been reported for a few years.  Read More
  • In Western Colorado, A Rising Number of Intersex Fish
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    A new study released Monday finds surprisingly high incidences of male fish carrying immature eggs in their testicles. The “intersex” fish are appearing throughout the nation, including in western Colorado. The study did not examine why the aquatic hermaphrodites were so prevalent in the nation’s waterways, though lead author Jo Ellen Hinck suggested it was unlikely any one human activity or contaminant was responsible. She added that far more research would have to be conducted before any reliable assertions could be made on the matter.  Read More
  • Gender-bending Bass Found in Yampa River
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    Male bass in Colorado rivers and other basins around the nation widely exhibit feminine sex traits, a federal fish study released Monday shows. This gender-bending was most common in the southeastern U.S. as well as in western Colorado, in the Yampa River, where 70 percent of male bass had eggs developing alongside their testicular organs, the U.S. Geological Survey study found.  Read More
  • 13 of the Most Gender-Bent U.S. Rivers
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    The nation's fish -- particularly two species popular with anglers -- are facing a widespread and ill-defined threat that is blending their genders. In the most comprehensive study to date -- of 16 species in nine river systems over nine years -- government scientists have for the first time documented the surprising pervasiveness of so-called intersex fish.  Read More
  • Widespread Occurrence of Intersex Bass Found in US Rivers
    Monday, September 14, 2009
    Intersex in smallmouth and largemouth basses is widespread in numerous river basins throughout the United States is the major finding of the most comprehensive and large-scale evaluation of the condition, according to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research published online in Aquatic Toxicology. Of the 16 fish species researchers examined from 1995 to 2004, the condition was most common by far in smallmouth and largemouth bass: a third of all male smallmouth bass and a fifth of all male largemouth bass were intersex. This condition is primarily revealed in male fish that have immature female egg cells in their testes, but occasionally female fish will have male characteristics as well.  Read More
  • Widespread Occurence of Intersex Bass Found in U.S. Rivers
    Monday, September 14, 2009
    Intersex in smallmouth and largemouth basses is widespread in numerous river basins throughout the United States, is the major finding of the most comprehensive and large-scale evaluation of the condition, according to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research published online in Aquatic Toxicology.
    Contact: Jo Ellen Hinck at 573-876-1808 or jhinck@usgs.gov
    CERC Pub Brief  Read More
  • Male Bass in Many US Rivers Feminized, Study Finds
    Monday, September 14, 2009
    Government scientists figure that one out of five male black bass in American river basins have egg cells growing inside their sexual organs, a sign of how widespread fish feminizing has become. The findings come from the U.S. Geological Survey in its first comprehensive examination of intersex fish in America, a problem linked to women's birth control pills and other hormone treatments that seep into rivers. Sporadic reports of feminized fish have been reported for a few years.  Read More
  • Intersex Bass Found in U.S. River Basins
    Monday, September 14, 2009
    A U.S. Geological Survey study has found intersex in smallmouth and largemouth bass to be widespread in numerous U.S. river basins. USGS scientists said their finding is the result of the most comprehensive and large-scale evaluation of the condition, which is primarily revealed in male fish having immature female egg cells in their testes, and occasionally female fish with male characteristics as well.  Read More
  • American Rivers Could Be Causing Intersexed Fish
    Monday, September 14, 2009
    The agency looked at past data from nine river basins - covering about two-thirds of the country - and found that about 6 percent of the nearly 1,500 male fish had a bit of female in them. The study looked at 16 different species, with most not affected. But the fish most feminized are two of the most sought-after freshwater sportfish: the largemouth and smallmouth, which are part of the black bass family. Those two species were also the most examined with nearly 500 black bass tallied.  Read More
  • Asian Carp in the Missouri River
    Monday, August 10, 2009
    USGS scientist Duane Chapman provided reporters and filming crew from National Geographic an educational Missouri River tour for the upcoming winter television special, "Monster Fish," which profiles invasive Asian carp. Chapman explained the carps' invasive history, the abundance of larvae compared to native fish, and why their anatomy makes carp such a fierce competitor. National Geographic will return in Sept. for more details on Asian carp research underway at the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center.  Read More
  • Experts Evaluate a Dangerous Spill
    Thursday, July 30, 2009
    USGS scientist Chris Ingersoll was interviewed and appeared on KOMU TV, Columbia, Mo., on July 30, 2009. The interview was about a biosolids spill along Missouri Callaway County Road UU, south of Columbia, due to a traffic accident. Dr. Ingersoll gave information regarding the transport and safety of biosolids, stating that this spill was not a hazard to the public.  Read More
  • Missouri River Float Trip Inspires Interest in History, Conservation
    Monday, July 13, 2009
    Aaron DeLonay, an employee for the Columbia Environmental Research Center, shows David Walchshauser a shovelnose sturgeon on California Island during the Big Canoe River Float on Saturday. Many of the sturgeon in the Missouri River are electronically tagged and monitored because of their status on the endangered species list. Sturgeon were around with the dinosaurs and many found in the river are more than 15 years old.  Read More
  • Asian Carp Facing Starvation, Reproductive Problems
    Sunday, June 07, 2009
    USGS scientist Duane Chapman of the Columbia Environmental Research Center, appeared on June 7, 2009, in the Columbia Missourian about Asian carp facing starvation and reproductive problems in the Missouri River. Chapman discussed their health decline, which is hypothesized to result from a low supply of zooplankton in the river.  Read More
  • CERC Scientist Wins 2009 Boeing Award
    Tuesday, February 03, 2009
    The American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) just notified the winners of its prestigious 2009 Boeing Award for Best Paper in Image Analysis and Interpretation. The award was given to USGS scientist Matthew Struckhoff, Columbia Environmental Research Center, and his co-authors, for the article entitled, "Mapping Vegetation Communities Using Statistical Data Fusion in the Ozark National Scenic Riverways, Missouri, USA," which appeared in the February 2008 issue of the journal. The ASPRS advances knowledge of mapping sciences through imaging and geospatial information, a professional, international society.  Read More
  • The Gender Gap
    Friday, January 30, 2009
    Exactly how the chemicals are able to transform males into females is the subject of continuous study. "There are several hypotheses about how a genetically male frog can become a phenotypic female frog or an intersex frog." Papoulias adds. "Most involve interference by the chemical [endocrine disruptor] on the sex steroids."  Read More
  • Ozarks at Large
    Tuesday, January 27, 2009
    A new website by the U.S Geological Survey focuses on the science and natural resources of the Ozarks and makes that information available to the public. Officials say the website was designed to inform the public about the natural and cultural resources of the Ozarks, while also facilitating the exchange of information. Ozarks at Large's Bryan Rachal has the story.  Read More
  • USGS Ozark Partnership Website
    Monday, January 26, 2009
  • Montana Group Seeks Native Status for Walleye
    Monday, January 19, 2009
    "I don't think there are very many serious scientists who think it could have been native to Montana," said Duane Chapman, president of the Introduced Fish Section in the American Fisheries Society, a leading organization of fisheries professionals. Walleye "have been moved around an awful lot through illegal stocking," Chapman said from Columbia, Mo. The fish is found widely in the United States.  Read More
  • The Discovery Channel
    Monday, January 12, 2009
    Duane Chapman  Read More
  • South Texas Birding
    Saturday, December 20, 2008
    Burrowing Owls and Eastern Screech Owls
    "Some call them our little winter Texans. Burrowing Owls breed in Canada and then fly south for the winter. But what do they do all day while they're here? To find out, we're joined by Marc Woodin of the U.S. Geological Society."  Read More
  • Low-volt Jolt: Carp Barrier Ready, But Can't Be Operated at Peak Strength
    Sunday, November 09, 2008
     "You can find fish of any size in the river at any time of year," said Duane Chapman, a biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. And if the fish are smaller than about five inches, tests have shown one volt simply will not repel them all."  Read More
  • Oh, Carp! Worden Man Bags 92-pound Monster with Bow and Arrow
    Thursday, May 08, 2008
    "According to Duane Chapman, a fish biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey who specializes in carp studies, Opel's catch is the largest on record by a recreational fisherman in the Western Hemisphere."  Read More
  • Missouri Biologist Frederick vom Saal and His Team Exposed the Dangers of Bisphenol A -- and Earned the Wrath of the Plastic Industry
    Thursday, April 24, 2008
     "On a spring day one year ago, scientists in life vests and blue jeans invaded the bucolic slice of nature where Perche Creek empties into the Missouri River. The scientists, representing the U.S. Geological Survey and a lab from the University of Missouri-Columbia, suspended mesh cages in the river's current and filled them with fathead minnows , the— white rat of the aquatic world, ideal for biological testing. Meanwhile, from the river's edge, National Geographic cameras took in the scene."  Read More
  • Columbia is Taking Steps to Examine Pharmaceuticals in Drinking Water
    Wednesday, April 23, 2008
    Michael Mac, director of the U.S. Geological Survey Columbia Environmental Research Center on New Haven Road, said pharmaceuticals infiltrate drinking water a couple of ways: excretory waste in the sewage system and the flushing of medications down the toilet. Hormones in birth control pills have been found in water, possibly affecting fish and other aquatic organisms, Mac said, adding he has witnessed male fish carrying eggs and developing other female characteristics.  Read More
  • The Plight of the Pallid Sturgeon
    Thursday, April 10, 2008
    Diana Papoulias, a fish biologist at CERC, began studying the reproductive effects of sturgeon in 2002. Little was known at the time, so she and her colleagues went out on the Missouri River and collected samples of sturgeon near Hartsburg and Boonville with a goal of obtaining 15 males and 15 females. They came back with something totally different.  Read More
  • Man-Made Chemicals May Put Strain on Fish
    Tuesday, March 18, 2008
    "The types of things we're finding are the types of things that are associated with everyday life," said David Alvarez, a U.S. Geological Survey research chemist who analyzed samples from the Potomac. The contaminants flow into the river from sewer plants and in rainwater washing off of farm fields and suburban lawns, he said.  Read More
  • Pursuing a Pallid Revival
    Monday, March 10, 2008
    Two biologists, Sabrina Davenport and Brian Carollo, both of the United States Geological Survey, tracked the pallid sturgeon Wednesday downstream from Atchison to an area south of Leavenworth. Both Ms. Davenport and Mr. Carollo are based at the Columbia Environmental Research Center of the USGS in Columbia, Mo. They usually stop in Atchison every one or two weeks. However, this week's stop marked the first since November.  Read More
  • The Unusual Suspects
    Friday, February 01, 2008
    Podcast  Read More
  • Struggling Sturgeon
    Wednesday, January 09, 2008
    Under the Endangered Species Act, the federal government is compelled to fight the endangered species’ decline, said Aaron DeLonay, an ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. But many of the scientists fighting for the fish do it because they want to. "It is a unique species that has taken thousands, maybe millions, of years to evolve," DeLonay said. "And once it is gone, it is gone forever."  Read More
  • Murky Waters
    Saturday, November 10, 2007
    Under the currents of the Missouri River lies a murky world where the currency is not water but sediment. From its mountainous headwaters in Montana to its mouth outside St. Louis, the Missouri River acts like a conveyor belt, moving millions of tons of sediment — a mixture of sand, soil and silt. At St. Louis, the Mississippi River takes over and carries the load down to the Gulf of Mexico. Over the past century, the system’s economy has been faltering. Signs from Kansas City to the Gulf indicate the river’s sediment — or lack of it — might have lasting environmental and economic ramifications.  Read More
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