USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center: Jo Ellen Hinck (NRDAR Coordinator)

Jo Ellen Hinck

Jo Ellen Hinck

Position:
NRDAR Coordinator
Employer: USGS
Staff Type: Center Staff
Duty Station: Columbia, MO
Branch: Office of the Center Director
Email: jhinck@usgs.gov
Phone: (573) 876-1808
Fax: (573) 876-1863
URL: http://www.cerc.usgs.gov/StaffMembers.aspx?StaffMemberId=323
Blog - Canyon Mine video
https://drive.google.com/a/usgs.gov/folderview?id=0B_0AHsjk2zloQUM2OXgxUTJhNjQ&usp=sharing

In The News

  • Science Still Developing on Uranium's Environmental Impact
    Sunday, April 19, 2015
  • Are They Boy or Girl Fish? It’s Now Harder to Tell
    Tuesday, January 11, 2011
    According to the US Geological Survey, intersex, the presence of both male and female characteristics within the same fish, is being observed in fish in more streams across the nation. Intersex is one manifestation of endocrine disruption in fish, which can also result in adverse effects on the development of the brain and nervous system, the growth and function of the reproductive system, and the response to stressors in the environment.  Read More
  • Rise of the She-Fish?
    Wednesday, August 25, 2010
    Scientists want to know if Rio Grande contaminants are feminizing the endangered silvery minnow.  Read More
  • Pharmed Fish
    Thursday, April 1, 2010
    In the Spring issue of Trout, a quarterly magazine of Trout Unlimited, is a feature story, "Pharmed Fish: Are Pharmaceuticals and Other Pollutants to Blame for Alarming Numbers of Intersex Fish?", highlighting USGS fish health research by Jo Ellen Hinck, conducted over a 10-year period across nine U.S. river basins, the Nation's first comprehensive look at fish health including the intersex condition.  Read More
  • Something Fishy in the Water
    Wednesday, November 25, 2009
    Dean Reynolds, Correspondent: "Something strange is happening to the fish in America's rivers, lakes and ponds. Chemical pollution seems to be disrupting their hormones, blurring the line between male and female."  text  Read More
  • Study: Gender-Bending Fish Widespread in U.S.
    Wednesday, September 16, 2009
    A survey of fish in rivers and streams around the country shows that a large percentage of male bass have acquired feminine characteristics. Scientists say it's the biggest survey of this gender-bending condition in U.S. waters. And while they can't be sure of the cause, they suspect industrial and pharmaceutical chemicals are the culprit.  Read More
  • More Hermaphrodite Fish in U.S. Rivers
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    Male fish with female body parts have been showing up in our nation's rivers for a while now, but a new study found a surprising number of mixed-up fish.
    From the Mississippi to the Rio Grande, from the Appalachia to the Colorado, researchers found large numbers of river fish with egg cells in their testes, particularly in two species: smallmouth and largemouth bass.  Read More
  • Widespread Occurrence Of Intersex Bass Found In U.S. Rivers
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    Of the 16 fish species researchers examined from 1995 to 2004, the condition was most common by far in smallmouth and largemouth bass: a third of all male smallmouth bass and a fifth of all male largemouth bass were intersex. This condition is primarily revealed in male fish that have immature female egg cells in their testes, but occasionally female fish will have male characteristics as well.  Read More
  • Widespread Occurrence of Intersex Bass Found in U.S. Rivers
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    Intersex in smallmouth and largemouth basses is widespread in numerous river basins throughout the United States is the major finding of the most comprehensive and large-scale evaluation of the condition, according to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research published online in Aquatic Toxicology.  Read More
  • U.S. Finds Hermaphroditic Bass Widespread in Nation's Rivers, Including Columbia
    Tuesday, September 15, 2009
    Sexual deformities in smallmouth and largemouth bass are more widespread than previously thought in river basins across the country, including the Columbia River basin in the Northwest.  Read More
  • USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center
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      • Hardesty, Doug
      • Harper, David
      • Hartman, Alison E., PhD
      • Hawkins, Casey, Student Services
      • Helmuth, Tyrell "Ty", Student Services
      • Henke, Abigail, Student Services
      • Henke, Chris, IT Branch Chief
      • Herndon, Anne
      • Hessler, Tyler, Student Services
      • Hickcox, Casey A
      • Hinck, Jo Ellen
      • Holmquist, Luke, Student Services
      • Holtswarth, Jordan
      • Hooper, Michael, PhD, Leader, Restoration Ecology
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  • Rip S Shively (Supervisory Biologist)
    • Jo Ellen Hinck (NRDAR Coordinator)
    • Tom Scott (Program Analyst)
    • Susan Finger (Volunteer)
    • Supervisory Research Ecologist
    • David Alvarez, PhD, Branch Chief (Supervisory Research Chemist)
    • Jeffery "Jeff" Steevens, PhD, Branch Chief (Supervisory Research Fish Biologist)
    • Robert Jacobson, PhD, Branch Chief (Supervisory Research Hydrologist)
    • Donald Tillitt, PhD, Branch Chief (Research Toxicologist)
    • Jamie Quade (Administrative Officer)
    • Chris Henke, IT Branch Chief (Supervisory Info Tech Specialist)
    • Frank C Proa, Safety and Quality Assurance Officer (Chemist)
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